Here’s Why Some Cities Are Giving Cash to Residents

Cities including Stockton, Calif. and Hudson, N.Y. are experimenting with different models related to universal basic income. In Stockton, a program that allocated $500 a month to 125 randomly selected households in low-income neighborhoods was scheduled to end in July has been extended until January. Meanwhile, Hudson is launching a pilot program to give $500 a month to randomly selected residents for five years.

KEY TAKEAWAYS
1. The funds have helped recipients get through the pandemic.

More than half of the funds from Stockton’s $3.8 million experiment have been spent on food and utilities, according to preliminary findings. Stockton’s 30-year-old mayor, Michael Tubbs, who pioneered the project, said of the spending, “What we found is that you can trust people to make good decisions.”

2. Critics are skeptical about the concept.

Some economists argue that no-strings-attached cash could be a disincentive for people to find work—especially if the money is

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Latest Santa Cruz Case Count; County Releases Halloween Guidance

SANTA CRUZ COUNTY, CA — Haunted houses, large parties and indoor mazes should be a no-go in the era of the coronavirus, Santa Cruz County officials announced Monday.

And even if your Halloween costume comes with a mask, you should still wear a face mask, officials said in a news release jointly issued by Bay Area health officers. Maybe this year is the one to focus on decorations and virtual costume contests.

The public should keep a close eye out for COVID-19 symptoms after the holiday — especially three to seven days afterward. Anyone who experiences symptoms can learn how to get tested in Santa Cruz County here.

“These holidays are no different than the rest of the year when it comes to reducing the spread of COVID-19,” health officials wrote.

Officials gave guidance on which seasonal activities are lower-risk, moderate-risk, high-risk and very-high risk. Here’s the official word on

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Clean Air & Public Health Experts and Policymakers Celebrate 50 Years of the Clean Air Act at Virtual Symposium

‘Clean Air for All’ online symposium highlights progress made and remaining obstacles to ensure clean air for all Americans

WASHINGTON, Sept. 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Fifty years after the passage of the Clean Air Act – the landmark public health law that has saved millions of American lives – policymakers, air quality experts, physicians and public health experts celebrated the anniversary and shared their insights into new and remaining threats to air quality during a virtual symposium.

American Lung Association logo (PRNewsfoto/American Lung Association)
American Lung Association logo (PRNewsfoto/American Lung Association)

“Clean Air for All: 50 Years of the Clean Air Act” was hosted by the American Lung Association and American University’s Center for Environmental Policy and Center for Environmental Filmmaking. The half-day event included several panel discussions featuring Clean Air Act author Tom Jorling; former EPA administrators Bill Reilly, Carol Browner and Gina McCarthy (who served both Democratic and Republican administrations); prominent environmental

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Early Results Show Moderna’s COVID Vaccine Safe, Effective in Older People | Health News

By E.J. Mundell
HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

TUESDAY, Sept. 29, 2020 (HealthDay News) — One of the big questions around any new COVID-19 vaccine is: Will it safely protect those at highest risk from the illness — older people?

Now, the results of an early phase 1 trial in 40 adults over the age of 55 suggests that one vaccine, under development by drugmaker Moderna, elicits an immune system response that’s equal to that seen in younger recipients.

As well, vaccine side effects “were predominantly mild or moderate in severity” and included fatigue, chills, headache or ache or discomfort at the injection site, according to the researchers.

They published the preliminary findings Sept. 29 online in the New England Journal of Medicine.

“As those at highest risk for severe COVID-19 infection are older adults, it is crucial to understand how well the vaccine works in this age group,” explained Dr.

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Benchmark Fitness’ Outdoor Trivia Workout Oct. 3 to support nonprofits

After the success of their grand opening, Benchmark Fitness, Crystal Lake’s newest fitness center, is welcoming the community to an outdoor trivia workout event to support nonprofits at 10:30 a.m. Saturday, Oct. 3.

Benchmark Fitness’ Outdoor Trivia Workout invites attendees to form a team of two to four people for a socially-distanced group fitness class. Along with a fun, challenging session that combines elements of HIIT and strength training, teams will battle it out through fitness-related trivia questions for a chance to win!

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

The top two teams will receive free T-shirts and one of the following: one month of group training for each participant; two personal training sessions per person; or three small-group fitness classes (in-person or virtual).

Each participant has the opportunity to submit the name of a 501(c)3 nonprofit organization they’d like to support. At the end of the workout, one of the submitted charities will be drawn

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The Latest: Missouri sees spike in virus hospitalizations

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Global Precision Medicine Market 2020 with (COVID-19) Impact Analysis, Product Type, Application, Key Manufacturers, Regions and Forecast to 2025

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.

Sep 29, 2020 (CDN Newswire via Comtex) —
A wide-ranging analysis report titled Global Precision Medicine Market 2020 by Company, Regions, Type and Application, Forecast to 2025 provides a brief overview of the market covering the scope, size, disposition, and growth of the industry. The report presents an estimate of the current market scenario and data related to the competitive landscape of the industry. It delivers five-year industry forecasts, growth rates, and an analysis of the industry key players and their market shares. The report shows information regards to several regions that have successfully established its position in the global Precision Medicine market. The geographical and competitive dynamics of this global market will help you get a comprehensive picture of the market.

An industrial chain, market measurements regarding revenue, sales, value, capacity, regional market examination, section insightful

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Air Pollutants, Metals Are Reaching The Placenta, Study Finds | Health News

By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

TUESDAY, Sept. 29, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Metals and other air pollutants have been found in the placentas of new mothers, which means such pollutants may be able to reach the fetus, researchers report.

“Our study for the first time shows that inhaled carbon particulate matter in air pollution travels in the blood stream, and is taken up by important cells in the placenta. We hope that this information will encourage policy makers to reduce road traffic emissions,” said lead author Dr. Jonathan Grigg, a professor of pediatric respiratory and environmental medicine at Queen Mary University of London.

His team analyzed placentas donated by 15 healthy women in London who had just given birth. Black particles that closely resembled particulate air pollution were found in an average of 1% of cells in all 15 placentas.

Most of the particles were carbon-based. But there were

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Texas officials: No earlier concerns after microbe found

Updated

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36 Additional Cases, 2 New Deaths

WASHINGTON, DC — D.C. Department of Health confirmed 36 new positive cases of COVID-19, the virus associated with the new coronavirus, on Tuesday. That more than double the 14 cases reported on Monday. This brings the District’s total number of positive cases to date to 15,300.

D.C. Health reported two new deaths due to COVID-19 on Tuesday. The deaths are described as two 80-year-old women. The total number of deaths in the District stands at 626.

According to D.C. Health, 386,396 coronavirus tests have been administered in the District, 214,731 residents have been tested, and 12,115 have been cleared from isolation.

The District currently has 46 intensive care unit beds available out of 345 total intensive care unit beds. There are currently 196 in-use ventilators out of a total of 440 available. Also, there are 23 COVID-19-positive ICU patients.

Get the latest updates on the new coronavirus in D.C. as

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