As a pandemic presses on, waves of grief follow its path

In a strong voice tinged with her Irish homeland, Fiona Prine talks hauntingly about loss. From her COVID-19 infection and isolation — self-imposed in hopes of sparing her husband, folk-country legend John Prine — to his own devastating illness and death, she’s had more than her share in this year like no other.

Illness and death are the pandemic’s most feared consequences, but a collective sense of loss is perhaps its most pervasive. Around the world, the pandemic has spread grief by degrees.

While less than 1% of the global population is known to have been infected, few on Earth have been spared some form of loss since the coronavirus took hold. With nearly 1 million deaths worldwide, full-blown bereavement is the most recognizable.

But even smaller losses can leave people feeling empty and unsettled.


Layoffs. Canceled visits with Grandpa. Shuttered restaurants. Closed gyms. These are losses that don’t fit

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Study: Women more likely than men to follow COVID-19 guidelines

Oct. 5 (UPI) — Women are more likely to adhere to guidelines from medical experts to prevent the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic than men, according to a study by researchers at Yale University and New York University.

Among the guidelines women followed more, were maintaining 6 feet social distance, handwashing and mask wearing in public, according to the study, published this week in Behavioral Science and Policy.

In previous findings, women have also been more likely to follow preventative practices, researchers noted.

“Previous research before the pandemic shows that women had been visiting doctors more frequently in their daily lives and following their recommendations more so than men,” lead author Irmak Olcaysoy Okten said in a press release.

“They also pay more attention to the health-related needs of others. So it’s not surprising that these tendencies would translate into greater efforts on behalf of women to prevent the spread

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Florida schools reopened en mass, but a surge in coronavirus didn’t follow, a USA TODAY analysis found.

Many teachers and families feared a spike in COVID-19 cases when Florida made the controversial push to reopen schools in August with in-person instruction.

US hits 200,000 COVID deaths ahead of schools reopening, looming flu season

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But a USA TODAY analysis shows the state’s positive case count among kids aged 5 to 17 declined through late September after a peak in July. Among the counties seeing surges in overall cases, it’s college-age adults – not school children – driving the trend, the analysis found.



a man and a woman sitting on a bench: Larry and Lianne Martin hug their daughter Riley Martin as she begins her first day of kindergarten at Lake Park Elementary School in East Naples, Monday, August 31, 2020.


© Jon Austria
Larry and Lianne Martin hug their daughter Riley Martin as she begins her first day of kindergarten at Lake Park Elementary School in East Naples, Monday, August 31, 2020.

The early results in Florida show the success of rigorous mask-wearing, social distancing, isolating contacts, and quick contact tracing when necessary, said health experts.

Start the day smarter.

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