25-year-old had life-threatening heart infection

CLOSE

Marian University’s Ramya Yeleti was sick with COVID-19 in April. The virus infected her heart, requiring open-heart surgery a month later.

Indianapolis Star

Leer en español

The last thing that Ramya Yeleti remembers thinking before she passed out in the emergency room that August day was that she might never wake up again.

The 25-year-old medical student knew something was very wrong with her heart, a suspicion the doctors’ reaction confirmed. Once they took her vitals, they ordered an EKG, whisked her back to a trauma room, and placed shock pads on her chest. They also gave her some medicine to try to bring her heart back into a normal rhythm.

“The doctors were obviously freaking out. Something is really, really wrong,” Yeleti recalled thinking. “Then I passed out. I remember just thinking I hope my family will be OK. … I did think I might die.”

Ramya Yeleti

Read More

Women’s Reproductive Health Tied to Later Heart Disease | Health News

By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Pregnancy complications, including preeclampsia and miscarriage, may be linked to an increased risk of heart disease later in life, a new study suggests.

For the study, the researchers analyzed 32 reviews that assessed women of childbearing age and their subsequent risk of heart disease. The women in those papers were followed for an average of seven to 10 years.

Several reproductive factors were linked with an up to twofold risk of heart disease later in life: starting periods early; use of combined oral contraceptives; polycystic ovary syndrome; miscarriage; stillbirth; preeclampsia; diabetes during pregnancy; preterm birth; low birth weight; and early menopause.

In addition, preeclampsia was associated with a fourfold risk of heart failure.

Family medical history, genetics, weight, high blood pressure and cholesterol levels, and chemical imbalances from use of hormonal contraceptives are among the possible explanations

Read More

Tennessee doctors removed a man’s heart to save his life

MEMPHIS, Tenn. – In an extraordinary operation, a Mississippi man’s heart was removed and replaced with what Baptist Memorial Hospital doctors call a “total artificial heart” — battery-charged electromechanical devices that will keep the 41-year-old man’s blood pumping until a heart transplant can be arranged.



a person wearing a hat: Heart patient Brian Pedigo sits on a hospital bed at Baptist Memorial Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. Pedigo's heart was replaced with two ventricular assist devices and a breast implant.


© Ariel Cobbert/The Commercial Appeal
Heart patient Brian Pedigo sits on a hospital bed at Baptist Memorial Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. Pedigo’s heart was replaced with two ventricular assist devices and a breast implant.

Wearing a surgical-style mask decorated with an American flag and the motto “United We Stand,” artificial heart recipient Brian Pedigosaid Wednesday that his life since his first heart attack —which came “11 days before my 33rd birthday” — had been a constant struggle with heart disease, including a “massive” 2017 heart attack and the almost complete bodily shutdown that led to his Sept. 3 surgery at

Read More

Successful heart operation for Norway’s aging monarch

FILE - In this Saturday, May 4, 2019 file photo, King Harald V of Norway and his wife Sonja leave the Notre Dame cathedral after attending at the funeral of the Grand Duke Jean of Luxembourg, in Luxembourg. Norway's 83-year-old King Harald V was admitted to the main hospital in Oslo Thursday, Oct. 8, 2020 to undergo an operation to replace a heart valve, the palace said. The surgery will not be an open heart operation, the palace said. The king will be awake, and the operation will be performed via the groin with local anesthesia.
FILE – In this Saturday, May 4, 2019 file photo, King Harald V of Norway and his wife Sonja leave the Notre Dame cathedral after attending at the funeral of the Grand Duke Jean of Luxembourg, in Luxembourg. Norway’s 83-year-old King Harald V was admitted to the main hospital in Oslo Thursday, Oct. 8, 2020 to undergo an operation to replace a heart valve, the palace said. The surgery will not be an open heart operation, the palace said. The king will be awake, and the operation will be performed via the groin with local anesthesia.Francisco Seco/AP

COPENHAGEN, Denmark (AP) — Norway’s 83-year-old King Harald V on Friday underwent an operation to replace a heart valve at the main hospital in Oslo. The palace said it was successful and his condition was described as good, the palace said.

Following the

Read More

Sleep Apnea Aid Eases Heart Problems in People With Prediabetes | Health News

By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 7, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Continuous positive airway pressure treatment, commonly known as CPAP, can lower heart disease risk in people with prediabetes, according to a new study.

In prediabetes, blood sugar levels are above normal but not high enough to be considered diabetes. CPAP is used to treat obstructive sleep apnea, a disorder in which breathing repeatedly stops and starts during sleep. A CPAP machine uses a mask to deliver steady air pressure into a person’s airway.

This new study found that, among people with prediabetes and sleep apnea, those who used CPAP for two weeks saw their resting heart rate fall by four to five beats per minute, compared to those who didn’t use CPAP.

With optimal CPAP treatment, heart rates were not only lower at night but also during the day, according to the report published Oct. 1 in

Read More

Personal resilience plays big part in heart health for Black Americans

Black people who have a strong sense of psychological well-being may have better heart health, a new study indicates.

It suggests that feelings of optimism and a sense of purpose and control — hallmarks of psychosocial resilience — are more important to heart health than where people live, researchers said.

Lead researcher Tené Lewis, an associate professor at Emory University’s Rollins School of Public Health in Atlanta, noted that differences in heart health between Black and White Americans have been documented for decades. But individual factors affecting Black Americans have not been well understood.

“Almost everything we know about Black Americans and their health focuses on deficits, yet we really need to begin to identify strengths,” she said. “Understanding which strengths matter most for Black Americans — and under which contexts — will allow us to develop the most appropriate and applicable public health interventions for this group.”

For the

Read More

the evidence of lingering heart damage

On 29 February, Melissa Vanier, a 52-year-old postal worker from Vancouver, had just returned from holiday in Cuba when she fell seriously ill with Covid-19. “For the entire month of March I felt like I had broken glass in my throat,” she says, describing a range of symptoms that included fever, migraines, extreme fatigue, memory loss and brain fog. “I had to sleep on my stomach because otherwise it felt like someone was strangling me.”

By the third week of March, Vanier had tested negative for Sars-CoV-2 – the virus that causes Covid-19. But although the virus had left her body, this would prove to be just the beginning of her problems. In May, she noticed from her Fitbit that her heart rate appeared to be highly abnormal. When cardiologists conducted a nuclear stress test – a diagnostic tool that measures the blood flow to the heart – it

Read More

Nina Agdal gets heart rates soaring in a red sports bra as she leads fitness class

In quarantine, Danish supermodel Nina Agdal has made the transition from walking runways to leading workout classes. 

The 28-year-old stunner whose been spending her time in the Hamptons with boyfriend Jack Brinkley Cook, 25, was spotted arriving at her socially distanced workout class in Amagansett. 

The model was masked up at The Reform Club Inn, as she prepared to get heart rates soaring at her Agdal Method class. 

Agdal method: Supermodel Nina Agdal, 28, prepared to teach one of her workout classes out in The Hamptons on Saturday. The Danish born beauty wore a red sports bra and a pair of tight spandex as she taught a group in a socially distanced class

For her day of teaching, Nina showed off her statuesque physique in a red Nike sports bra that she paired with black spandex leggings. 

She toted along a green sweatshirt around her waist, tucking her cell phone

Read More

Tough menopause may signal future heart issues, study says

As if the misery of hot flashes, night sweats and sleep troubles weren’t enough, now new research suggests that women who routinely experience moderate to severe menopausal symptoms have a higher risk of stroke and heart disease.

“This analysis assessed various menopausal symptoms and their association with health outcomes. Women with two or more moderate to severe menopausal symptoms had an increased risk of stroke and cardiovascular disease,” said study author Dr. Matthew Nudy, a cardiology fellow at Penn State Hershey Medical Center.

This study didn’t prove a cause-and-effect relationship, it only showed an association between menopausal symptoms and stroke and other heart and blood vessel diseases. It’s possible that menopause symptoms might not be a cause of these problems at all. It may be that other factors, such as obesity or diabetes, may lead to both menopausal symptoms and poor health outcomes.

Nudy also noted that past research has

Read More

Diabetes in Pregnancy Tied to Heart Risks in Young Adult Children

People whose mothers had diabetes before or during pregnancy have an increased risk for heart disease as young adults, new research suggests. The risk was apparent both for children of mothers with pre-existing Type 2 diabetes and for children whose mothers developed gestational diabetes during pregnancy.

The study, in the journal CMAJ, included 293,546 people born to mothers in Manitoba between 1979 and 2005. Almost 3 percent were exposed to gestational diabetes and 1.1 percent to maternal Type 2 diabetes. The scientists followed the offsprings’ health through age 35.

They found that after adjustment for other factors, exposure to gestational diabetes was associated with a 27 percent increased risk for a cardiovascular event — heart attack, cardiac arrest, coronary artery disease or stroke. The group was also 85 percent more likely to have a cardiovascular disease risk factor such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol or diabetes.

For people whose

Read More