I volunteered for a COVID-19 vaccine trial in New Jersey. Here’s what it’s been like since the shot.

On the afternoon of Sept. 22, I became a data point in the search for a vaccine to prevent COVID-19.

Why a vaccine for coronavirus will take longer to develop than you might think

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That’s when I received the first of two shots in a clinical trial to develop a vaccine, and became one of 30,000 volunteers to take a needlestick for science.

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Why am I doing it? A combination of altruism, curiosity, and a sense of duty as a journalist. But more on that later.

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Aside from the nurse who injected me and the hospital pharmacy that supplied her with the injection, no one else knows whether I received a placebo or the would-be vaccine. Not me. Not even Dr. Bindu Balani, the principal investigator in the

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As COVID-19 cases rise again, how will the US respond? Here’s what states have learned so far

<span class="caption">States have tried shutting down bars and limiting restaurants to outdoor seating to slow the coronavirus's spread.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="http://gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/patrons-dine-at-an-outdoor-restaurant-along-5th-avenue-in-news-photo/1227674724" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images">Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images</a></span>
States have tried shutting down bars and limiting restaurants to outdoor seating to slow the coronavirus’s spread. Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images

When COVID-19 began spreading in the U.S. in early spring, governors in hard-hit states took drastic steps to reduce the threat and avoid overloading their health care systems. By shutting down nonessential businesses and schools and ordering people to stay home, they slowed the virus’s spread, but several million people lost jobs.

Since then, we’ve witnessed a series of ad hoc experiments with more targeted approaches. As states started to reopen, they tested different levels of restrictions, such as face mask mandates and capacity constraints on restaurants. Some closed bars when cases rose again but left other businesses open. Others set restrictions that would be triggered only for hot spots when a county’s positive case numbers passed a certain threshold.

Now, as cooler weather moves more people indoors and daily

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You should smile behind your mask. Here’s why.

The short answer: Yes, because it can affect your emotions as well as theirs. Here are the reasons you should continue smiling behind your mask.

Social contact is important for humans (including introverts)

Bea de Gelder, professor of cognitive neuroscience at Maastricht University in the Netherlands, says that, as social creatures, humans weren’t designed to obscure our facial expressions with cloth coverings. “Social contact,” she says, “is as essential to survival as food and drink.” It’s more than the fact that we rely on others to meet our basic needs in both the early and late stages of life, she says. Research shows that social contact improves physical and mental health, increases immunity and reduces stress.

This sense of connection supports our well-being, whether we realize it or not. Michelle “Lani” Shiota, associate professor of psychology at Arizona State University, explains: “When we’re smiling and engaging with other people, it’s

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Coronavirus in Illinois updates: Here’s what happened Oct. 7 with COVID-19 in the Chicago area

Officials reported 58,820 new tests in the last 24 hours, as the state surpasses 6 million total COVID-19 tests. The seven-day statewide positivity rate is 3.5%.

The new statewide numbers come as Gov. J.B. Pritzker said Wednesday that the gains that most regions in Illinois had been making in bringing down COVID-19 positivity rates in recent weeks have “cooled off a bit.” The governor noted specifically that the northeastern region that includes Lake and McHenry counties has seen a reversal after a period of decline.

“That progress has cooled off a bit, across Illinois,” Pritzker said. “We are seeing changes in positivity averages around the state level off, with three regions that were decreasing last week now sitting at a stable level.”

Here’s what’s happening Wednesday with COVID-19 in the Chicago area and Illinois:

7:15 p.m.: CPS says clerks must report to work in person, despite labor ruling that questions

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Is Trump ready to hit the campaign trail? Here’s what doctors say

Just days after receiving oxygen therapy for Covid-19, US President Donald Trump is busy giving long TV interviews and says he’s eager to return to the campaign trail. 

But is he risking his recovery by taking on too much too soon, and could he still infect others? 

– Each case is unique – 

According to Amesh Adalja, an infectious disease and critical care doctor as well as scholar at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, there is a wide variation between patients in terms of the speed of their recovery.

“Some people are able to resume their activities of daily living pretty quickly. There are other people to take some weeks before they’re back to their baseline,” he said.

In general, “for someone in their 70s who was hospitalized with Covid, I would say it takes a couple of weeks to get back to their baseline.

“But because he’s the president,

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COVID-19 in Illinois updates: Here’s what’s happening Thursday

The daily number of new known coronavirus cases announced by Illinois officials on Thursday was the highest in nearly five months, except for a day in early September when the state caught up on a testing backlog.

The 3,059 new known cases represents the first time the daily count has topped 3,000 since May 14, when the Illinois Department of Public Health reported 3,239 cases. The department reported 5,368 new cases on Sept. 4, but that was due to a backlog in processing test results.

In addition to the newly confirmed cases, which bring the total number known infections to 310,700 statewide since the pandemic began, officials on Thursday reported 32 more fatalities. That brings the death toll to 8,910. Officials also reported 72,491 new tests in the last 24 hours. The seven-day statewide positivity rate is 3.7%.

The new numbers come as Gov. J.B. Pritzker said Wednesday that the

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This remote county has the highest COVID case rate in Calif.: Here’s why

Two more residents of Shasta County died from the coronavirus Wednesday, bringing the county total since the start of the pandemic to 24, health officials reported. In the last week, the county has reported 302 new cases.

These numbers may be surprising in this pocket of Northern California known for vast open spaces and endless forests, but COVID-19 outbreaks across the country have shown that the virus can spiral out of control anywhere.

The spike in Shasta County is being driven by spates of cases at an evangelical school and a nursing facility in Redding, the county’s largest city (pop. 91,000).


Bethel School of Supernatural Ministry in Redding asked its entire 1,600-person student body to self-quarantine as the number of coronavirus cases among students and staff rose above 100 since classes started a month ago.

Off-campus housing has been a primary source of transmission, along with “social interactions outside of

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Doctors die by suicide at twice the rate of everyone else. Here’s what we can do.

That Monday when I asked Skip’s opinion — this time, on a troubling case of weight loss — I knew I would find him with his tie askew and his glasses crooked, which I did. He sat in his chair and listened, asking questions about food insecurity and other social determinants of health.

But that Monday was different. After we talked, Skip canceled his patients for the week, left the office and killed himself.

We were all blindsided. How did we not know? Was he depressed? Was he reaching out for help? If this could happen to him, who else could it happen to?

We would later learn about his struggles with other health issues, including possible dementia, but confusion still reverberated in our exam rooms and meetings. Administrators from the hospital met with us and talked of “making time for wellness” and “taking care,” but it rang hollow, and

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Trump reports feeling better, but here’s why the next few days are ‘the real test’ in his COVID-19 battle

President Donald Trump’s battle with COVID-19 will come to a critical turning point in the next few days as the disease tests his immune system.



Donald Trump wearing a suit and tie: President Donald Trump is pictured speaking during the first presidential debate in Cleveland, Ohio.


© Julio Cortez, AP
President Donald Trump is pictured speaking during the first presidential debate in Cleveland, Ohio.

On Saturday, Trump and his doctors acknowledged the importance of the coming days as the illness enters what White House physician Dr. Sean Conley called “phase 2.”

In a video statement released Saturday evening from Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Trump echoed the concern: “I’m starting to feel good. You don’t know over the next period of a few days, I guess that’s the real test, so we’ll be seeing what happens over those next couple of days.”

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The course of COVID-19 can be highly variable, but the next three

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Here’s What Trump’s Physician Said About the President’s Condition Following His COVID Diagnosis

From Men’s Health

President Donald Trump is “doing very well” after his first night at Walter Reed Medical Center, White House physician Dr. Sean Conley said Saturday in a press conference. Dr. Conley was flanked by other members of the president’s medical team, who briefed the press on the president’s condition and revealed new details about the timeline of his diagnosis and treatment.

The president has been fever-free for 24 hours and has normal organ function, according to the doctors. Trump will be on a five-day course of the experimental antiviral therapy remdesivir. Reporters repeatedly pressed Dr. Conley on whether Trump has received supplemental oxygen at Walter Reed. Dr. Conley said Trump is not currently on supplemental oxygen, but would not confirm whether the president has needed it so far.

Conley also shared that the president asked about hydroxychloroquine—a drug Trump has championed despite there being little evidence it can

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