Pain Pill Abuse Higher in Adolescent CBD Oil Users

Adolescent users of cannabidiol (CBD) oil are far more likely to engage in risk-taking behaviors ― such as illegally taking prescription pain medications ― than peers who don’t use CBD, new research indicates.

The study, which included data on 200 youths aged 12 to 23 years, also suggests that 4 in 10 use CBD oil products. Users also reported experiencing increased anxiety over the prior 6 months, but the researchers couldn’t pinpoint whether CBD oil, which is marketed for anxiety relief, might contribute to participants’ anxiety levels.



Nicole Cumbo

“A lot of kids don’t talk to their clinicians about CBD” use, said study author Nicole Cumbo, BS, a third-year medical student at Penn State Milton S. Hershey Medical Center in Hershey, Pennsylvania.

“It’s important to ask kids if they’re using CBD, along with vaping and marijuana use, because it could be causing them more problems than it helps,” Cumbo told

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COVID-19 ICU patients have higher risk for blood clots, study shows

Hospitalized COVID-19 patients face an increased risk of developing dangerous blood clots, a new review indicates.

The odds of a clot are highest for the most critically ill patients. Analysis of 66 studies found that 23% of COVID-19 patients in an intensive care unit developed a blood clot in the leg, known as a deep vein thrombosis, or DVT.

Overall prevalence of a DVT was 14% among ICU and non-ICU COVID-19 patients, and 8% among those with mild-to-moderate disease risk who were not admitted to the ICU.

The “numbers are surprisingly high when compared with other hospitalized patients,” said study author Dr. Cihan Ay.

Of great concern are blood clots in the legs that can break away and travel to the lungs. This is a life-threatening condition known as pulmonary embolism, or PE.

Nearly 4% of patients not admitted to the ICU developed a pulmonary embolism. And “we found a

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Common Heartburn Meds Tied to Higher Diabetes Risk | Health News

By Serena Gordon
HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

FRIDAY, Oct. 2, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Often-used drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) ease heartburn symptoms, but a new study suggests they might also increase the risk of type 2 diabetes.

Chinese researchers drew on information from studies of more than 200,000 U.S. health care professionals and found that regular use of PPIs (such as Aciphex, Nexium, Prilosec, Prevacid, Protonix) was associated with a 24% higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

The researchers also found that the longer people used the drugs, the higher their odds of diabetes.

“Regular PPI use was likely to be associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, particularly for those with prolonged use,” the authors wrote in the report published online Sept. 28 in the journal Gut.

Jinqiu Yuan, a researcher from the Sun Yat-Sen University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China, led the study.

PPIs are

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Common heartburn meds linked to higher diabetes risk

Often-used drugs called proton pump inhibitors, or PPIs, ease heartburn symptoms, but a new study suggests they might also increase the risk of type 2 diabetes.

Chinese researchers drew on information from studies of more than 200,000 U.S. health care professionals and found that regular use of PPIs — such as Aciphex, Nexium, Prilosec, Prevacid, Protonix — was associated with a 24% higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes.

The researchers also found that the longer people used the drugs, the higher their odds of diabetes.

“Regular PPI use was likely to be associated with an increased risk of type 2 diabetes, particularly for those with prolonged use,” the authors wrote in the report published online this week in the journal Gut.

Jinqiu Yuan, a researcher from the Sun Yat-Sen University, Shenzhen, Guangdong, China, led the study.

PPIs are available by prescription or over-the-counter to treat acid reflux, peptic ulcers

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At 74, President Trump Is at Higher Risk of COVID-19 Complications

Trump COVID-19 Coronavirus Age
Trump COVID-19 Coronavirus Age

U.S. President Donald Trump speaks to reporters on his way to Marine One on the South Lawn of the White House on September 30, 2020 in Washington, D.C. Credit – Drew Angerer—Getty Images)

The news that U.S. President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump have tested positive for COVID-19 is a reminder of two stark truths that we’ve known since the first days that the novel coronavirus reached the United States: that the virus respects no boundaries, and that older people are at higher risk of getting infected.

About 10 months into the pandemic, the science shows that the elderly not only remain more vulnerable to infections but are also more likely to develop severe illness. About 80% of deaths in the U.S. from COVID-19 have occurred in those 65 or older, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

At this point,

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Several New York zip codes are reporting infection rates five times higher than statewide rate

New York has reported several Covid-19 clusters that have created “hotspot” zip codes, the governor said, with a positivity rate about five times more than statewide.



a person taking a selfie in a car: Medical technicians work at a drive-thru coronavirus disease (COVID-19) testing facility at the Regeneron Pharmaceuticals company's Westchester campus in Tarrytown, New York, U.S. September 17, 2020. Picture taken September 17, 2020. Brendan McDermid/Reuters


© Brendan McDermid/Reuters
Medical technicians work at a drive-thru coronavirus disease (COVID-19) testing facility at the Regeneron Pharmaceuticals company’s Westchester campus in Tarrytown, New York, U.S. September 17, 2020. Picture taken September 17, 2020. Brendan McDermid/Reuters

The new clusters are a “stark reminder” that the state is still not out of the woods when it comes to the pandemic, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said.

“We’ve had clusters in the past stemming from factories, churches, bars and other locations,” Cuomo said . “We’re quite familiar with this, and when there’s a cluster, we are very aggressive on it and we’re oversampling in the clusters.”

Cuomo’s announcement comes as states across the US have begun reporting alarming Covid-19 trends in recent days — and after experts

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Higher ‘Time in Range’ May Benefit Type 2 Diabetes Patients

Patients with type 2 or type 1 diabetes who stay in a blood glucose range of 70-180 mg/dL at least 70% of the time have the lowest rates of major adverse coronary events, severe hypoglycemic episodes, and microvascular events, according to a post hoc analysis of data collected from 5,774 patients with type 2 diabetes.

Data collected by the DEVOTE trial showed that every additional 10% of the time that a patient with type 2 diabetes (T2D) spent in their target range for blood glucose linked with a significant 6% reduced rate for developing a major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE), Richard M. Bergenstal, MD, said at the virtual annual meeting of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes.

For every 10% increase in time in range (TIR), patients showed an average 10% drop in their incidence of severe hypoglycemic episodes.

Increasing Evidence From Post Hoc Analyses

These findings confirmed

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Let the stairs take you to a higher level of fitness

story.lead_photo.captionEmmanuel Eyiuche does the Staircase Ladder Drill at Little Rock Athletic Club, where he is a personal trainer. (Democrat-Gazette photo illustration/Celia Storey)

If you look hard enough, fitness opportunities can be found almost anywhere. The thing is, people associate certain places or structures with either a negative or positive connotation based on their experience.

As the world continues to navigate the complexities of social distancing, it’s worth discussing the common places that exercise can be performed — outside the gym.

I want to try a little imagination exercise. Close your eyes and take a deep breath in.

Imagine you are walking through a park with vivid green grass, a slight breeze that’s just enough to cool your skin, and not another person in sight.

You glance across the park and see a large playground structure. Think about how this makes you feel.

As you continue walking, you arrive at a

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Laughing the best medicine to avoid higher nursing care risks: Japan researchers

This image shows a smiling couple. (Getty)

Kenji Takeuchi, an associate professor at Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine who conducted research on the relationship between laughter and nursing care risks, is shown in this photo provided by him.


TOKYO — The effect a chuckle has on an individual’s physical and mental health has been scientifically examined from various angles and one central Japan study has found that the absence of laughter can lead to serious nursing care risks for the elderly.


A research team at Nagoya University studied the differences in the potential likelihood of requiring nursing care between individuals who laugh regularly and those who do not giggle as much. The unprecedented, large-scale research examined some 14,000 people over a span of three years.


The research team was led by Kenji

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