Trump to Hold White House Rally as Fauci Says Superspreader Event Occurred There | Health News

By Robin Foster and E.J. Mundell
HealthDay Reporters

(HealthDay)

SATURDAY, Oct. 10, 2020 (HealthDay News) — Even as the nation’s top infectious diseases expert said Friday that the White House experienced a “superspreader” event in the Rose Garden last month, President Donald Trump announced he will hold his first public event at the White House since testing positive for the coronavirus a week ago.

The Saturday event, which will have Trump speaking from a balcony to a crowd of supporters on the South Lawn, has already caused concern among some officials in the White House, which has been rocked by an outbreak following Trump’s diagnosis, the Washington Post reported.

Trump’s medical team has not yet released the results of Trump’s latest COVID-19 test, so it was unclear whether Trump is still contagious, the Post reported. But Trump has ignored his advisers’ calls for caution, the newspaper reported, instead playing down

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Trump says he wants to hold a rally on Saturday after his doctor cleared him to resume public events.

President Trump’s doctor said on Thursday that the president had completed his treatments to alleviate the symptoms of the coronavirus and that he anticipated Mr. Trump would be able to resume “public engagements” on Saturday.

The forecast about Mr. Trump’s condition came from the White House physician, Dr. Sean Conley, in a note updating people on his health.

As of Friday morning, it has been one week since Mr. Trump announced that he had tested positive for the virus, though neither he nor White House officials have disclosed when he last tested negative before that announcement.

Thursday night, the president called in to Sean Hannity’s show on Fox News and said he wanted to hold a rally in Florida on Saturday and another in Pennsylvania on Sunday. He went on to say he was in “great shape” — even as he paused on a few occasions and seemed to cough

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‘Love Hormone’ Could Hold Key to Treating COVID | Health News

By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter

(HealthDay)

FRIDAY, Oct. 9, 2020 (HealthDay News) — The so-called love hormone, oxytocin, may be worth investigating as a treatment for COVID-19, a new study suggests.

One of the most serious complications of infection with the new coronavirus is a “cytokine storm,” in which the body attacks its own tissues.

There are currently no U.S. Food and Drug Administration-approved treatments for COVID-19, which means that “repurposing existing drugs that can act on the adaptive immune response and prevent the cytokine storm in early phases of the disease is a priority,” according to the researchers.

Previous research suggests that oxytocin — a hormone that’s produced in the brain and is involved in reproduction and childbirth — reduces inflammation.

In this new study, researcher Ali Imami, a graduate research assistant at the University of Toledo in Ohio, and colleagues used a U.S. National Institutes of Health database

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Trump suggests he may hold weekend rallies in Florida, Pennsylvania after receiving green light from doctor

President Trump told Fox News’ Sean Hannity in an exclusive interview Thursday that his campaign is trying to make last-minute arrangements for holding weekend rallies in Florida and Pennsylvania after White House physician Dr. Sean Conley cleared him for public engagements earlier in the day.

“I think I’m going to try doing a rally on Saturday night if we have enough time to put it together,” Trump said on “Hannity”.

WH DR: TRUMP CAN RETURN TO PUBLIC ENGAGEMENTS THIS WEEKEND

“We want to do a rally probably in Florida on Saturday night. I might come back and do one in Pennsylvania the following night,” he said, adding that “it’s incredible what’s going on. I feel so good.”

Dr. Conley sent out a memorandum Thursday evening stating that Trump will be able to return to public engagements this weekend, noting that Saturday will mark ten days since he was first diagnosed

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Supreme Court puts on hold Trump administration request to reimpose medication abortion restrictions

“While COVID-19 has provided the ground for restrictions on First Amendment rights, the District Court saw the pandemic as a ground for expanding the abortion right recognized in Roe v. Wade,” wrote Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr., who was joined by Justice Clarence Thomas.

Alito said the court has “stood by” while officials imposed restrictions on religious activities and “drastically limited speech, banning or restricting public speeches, lectures, meetings, and rallies.”

The court’s action in this case cannot be squared with that, Alito wrote.

Chuang ruled in July that requiring an in-person visit to obtain the medications needed to induce abortion was unduly burdensome. There is no requirement that a woman take the medication in a clinic setting, and most take the pills that end a pregnancy in its early stages at home.

At the request of abortion providers and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, Chuang

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U.S. Government Asks Vaccine Makers To Hold Filing for Authorization Until They Have Enough Doses to Distribute

President Trump Makes Statement On Vaccine Development
President Trump Makes Statement On Vaccine Development

Moncef Slaoui, head of the White House’s “Operation Warp Speed” project to develop a coronavirus vaccine, listens to U.S. President Donald Trump deliversremarks about vaccine development in the Rose Garden of the White House on May 15, 2020 in Washington, DC. Credit – Drew Angerer—Getty Images

As the COVID-19 pandemic enters its 10th month, the pressure to develop an effective vaccine, or vaccines, continues to mount. Speaking at the Johns Hopkins University and University of Washington Vaccine Symposium online, Dr. Moncef Slaoui, scientific head of Operation Warp Speed—the government organization funding and supporting development and distribution of COVID-19 vaccines—provided the latest updates on when a vaccine (and how many doses) might be available in coming months.

Perhaps most strikingly, Slaoui said that the government has told vaccine manufacturers not to seek authorization of their drugs from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) until

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In information vacuum, experts say Trump’s steroid treatment may hold clues to health status

But the combination of drugs physicians have administered to the president – in particular, the decision to use a steroid called dexamethasone – may offer insights into his status, experts said.

“They are doing things for him that would imply he has more severe disease than they are saying,” said Dr. Michael Niederman, a critical care physician at New York-Presbyterian who has not been involved in the president’s treatment.

Dr. Sean Conley, the president’s personal physician, said Saturday that the ailing commander in chief was supplied an experimental antibody cocktail and an FDA authorized antiviral treatment called remdesivir, which is available to hospitalized COVID-19 patients. On Sunday, Conley said a third drug had been added to the mix: the steroid dexamethasone.

Steroids

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Antimatter Particles Hold Key In Timely Attack Against Growing Tumors

KEY POINTS

  • A timer invented by experts permits PET scanners to attack  cancer cells in their weakest
  • The invention may pave the way to less invasive radiation treatment for cancer patients
  • Inventors hoped the technology can be made more affordable in a decade

Doctors may soon kill cancer tumors with less invasive side effects of radiation treatment. This is after a team of experts designed a scanner that can time the antimatter particles that are significant in detecting the levels of the oxygen concentration in cancer tissues. For years, medical experts have witnessed how low levels of oxygen prevented the timely killing of rapidly growing cancer cells. 

A team of Japanese atomic physicists and nuclear medicine experts designed a timer that can detect the oxygen concentration of tissues growing throughout ta cancer patient’s body. Specifically, the timer permits the positron emission tomography (PET) scanners to know when to attack the

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Way to Go! New Hyde Park students hold virtual blood drive

Two students from New Hyde Park Memorial High School have been combating the shortage of blood because of the coronavirus outbreak.

Aarti Devjani and Preesha Mody, both seniors, coordinated a seven-week virtual blood drive through the New York Blood Center in which individuals could schedule appointments to give blood through the center’s website. The drive allowed participants to stay safe and socially distance while helping their community, the students said.

As of late September, about 35 people had donated blood to the students’ drive, which ends Oct. 15. The duo has also raised more than $3,600 for the center through a GoFundMe page.

“This idea started in the middle of quarantine when we realized no one’s going anywhere,” Mody said. “Then my dad actually sent me this article about how there’s a shortage of blood, so we though ‘let’s do something about it.'”

The students then spread the word through

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Hold Off Radiotherapy After Prostate Cancer Surgery

Most men who undergo radical prostatectomy can skip adjuvant radiotherapy and can be followed with observation alone. They can undergo early salvage radiotherapy if the disease shows sign of progressing, say experts reporting results from three similar clinical trials.

This approach would allow most men to avoid radiotherapy and its side effects altogether, the investigators emphasize.

The studies were published online September 28 in The Lancet and The Lancet Oncology.

“There is a strong case now that observation should be the standard approach after surgery and [that] radiotherapy should only be used if the cancer comes back,” commented Chris Parker, MD, the Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust and the Institute of Cancer Research, London, United Kingdom.

“Results suggest that radiotherapy is equally effective whether it is given to all men shortly after surgery or given later to those men with recurrent disease,” he said in a statement.

Parker was lead

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