Researchers gave homeless people money and what they did with it might surprise you

A nonprofit organization led a study that explores what might happen if people who are homeless are given financial support and the results may surprise you.

Foundations for Social Change, a Canadian charitable organization based in Vancouver, British Columbia, teamed up with the University of British Columbia for a social program, called the New Leaf Project. Researchers gave 7,500 Canadian dollars (approximately $5,717.27) via direct transfer to 50 people who had recently become homeless. The people were free to use the money as they saw fit with no restrictions.

To the surprise of the researchers, most of the recipients used the cash to turn their lives around. “Preliminary results show that on average, those receiving the direct cash payment moved into stable housing faster, maintained a level of financial security and stability over 12 months of follow-up, and increased their spending on food, clothing and rent,” said Foundations for Social

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Van Nuys dentist says nearby homeless encampments may force her out of business

VAN NUYS, LOS ANGELES (KABC) — Dr. Elizabeth Rojas says she wanted to invest in her community, but she says nearby homeless encampments may force her out of business and she fears her dream is now shattered.

“It’s just become a scary situation,” says Rojas.

She set up a dentistry office in Van Nuys where she grew up. She says the area is now surrounded by homeless encampments and it is not safe.

“They’re defecating, urinating but now it’s just become violent, it’s constant, they’re always fighting — they have machetes, they have knives, they have hammers,” Rojas says.

She says her security camera have caught people naked on the street, others armed with knives or screwdrivers, and two men breaking into her building. There is video of two people attacking someone on the ground.

“They’re fighting over ‘get my knife, she stole my drugs’ and they’re just attacking each

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This was to be the year for California’s homeless. Instead it’s a slow ‘train wreck’

Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority outreach worker Monica Palma, center, visits with Kim M. and her dog Dee-O-G who live homeless under the Santa Monica Freeway along Venice Boulevard in Los Angeles on July 8. <span class="copyright">(Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority outreach worker Monica Palma, center, visits with Kim M. and her dog Dee-O-G who live homeless under the Santa Monica Freeway along Venice Boulevard in Los Angeles on July 8. (Genaro Molina / Los Angeles Times)

The message wasn’t lost on Daniel Gonzalez.

Early in the pandemic, one of the first things Imperial County did to ward off the virus was close the public bathrooms and, later, public cooling centers. In this sprawling Southern California desert, where summer brings blistering triple-digit heat, that lack of access could amount to a death sentence for people without shelter.

People like Gonzalez, homeless the past two years, were simply not a priority.

Months into the coronavirus shutdown, Gonzalez, 47, felt lonely. Calexico’s quiet downtown had emptied out. July highs were topping 110, and it was uncomfortable wearing a mask in the swelter. But not having a place to

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Work Or Online Learning? Homeless Families Face An Impossible Choice : NPR

Freda and her 9-year-old son visit the Purple People Bridge in Cincinnati. She and her five children have been living in the front room of a friend’s apartment, sleeping on pads of bunched-up comforters.

Maddie McGarvey for NPR


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Maddie McGarvey for NPR

Freda and her 9-year-old son visit the Purple People Bridge in Cincinnati. She and her five children have been living in the front room of a friend’s apartment, sleeping on pads of bunched-up comforters.

Maddie McGarvey for NPR

The closure of school buildings in response to the coronavirus has been disruptive and inconvenient for many families, but for those living in homeless shelters or hotel rooms — including roughly 1.5 million school-aged children — the shuttering of classrooms and cafeterias has been disastrous.

For Rachel, a 17-year-old sharing a hotel room in Cincinnati with her mother, the disaster has been academic. Her school gave

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