25-year-old had life-threatening heart infection

CLOSE

Marian University’s Ramya Yeleti was sick with COVID-19 in April. The virus infected her heart, requiring open-heart surgery a month later.

Indianapolis Star

Leer en español

The last thing that Ramya Yeleti remembers thinking before she passed out in the emergency room that August day was that she might never wake up again.

The 25-year-old medical student knew something was very wrong with her heart, a suspicion the doctors’ reaction confirmed. Once they took her vitals, they ordered an EKG, whisked her back to a trauma room, and placed shock pads on her chest. They also gave her some medicine to try to bring her heart back into a normal rhythm.

“The doctors were obviously freaking out. Something is really, really wrong,” Yeleti recalled thinking. “Then I passed out. I remember just thinking I hope my family will be OK. … I did think I might die.”

Ramya Yeleti

Read More

A vaccine can provide better immunity than infection, expert says

Two recent studies have confirmed that two people previously infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes Covid-19, can be reinfected with the virus.



a person wearing a mask: vaccine trial latino black nws orig_00001709.jpg


© Provided by CNN
vaccine trial latino black nws orig_00001709.jpg

Interestingly, the two people had different outcomes. The person in Hong Kong showed no symptoms on the second infection, while the person from Reno, Nevada, had a more severe version of the disease the second time around. It is therefore unclear if an immune response to SARS-CoV-2 will protect against subsequent reinfection.

Does this mean a vaccine will also fail to protect against the virus? Certainly not. First, it is still unclear how common these reinfections are. More importantly, a fading immune response to natural infection, as seen in the Nevada patient, does not mean we cannot develop a successful, protective vaccine.

READ MORE: Big pharma’s safety pledge isn’t enough to build public confidence in a

Read More

Increase in COVID-19 deaths in England ‘baked in’ after infection spike, deputy CMO warns

Deputy chief medical officer Jonathan Van-Tam during a media briefing in Downing Street, London, on coronavirus
Deputy chief medical officer Jonathan Van Tam warned that COVID-19 deaths will increase in the next few weeks in England. (PA Images via Getty Images)
  • Spike in coronavirus deaths inevitable after recent wave of new cases, Jonathan Van Tam warns

  • He says deaths are “baked in” with increased infections – with more patients in hospital now than when national lockdown was enforced in March

  • It comes as Nightingale hospitals in north of England are asked to mobilise

  • Visit the Yahoo homepage for more stories

The recent spike in coronavirus cases will lead to an increase in deaths in a matter of weeks, England’s deputy chief medical officer has warned.

Jonathan Van Tam said further hospitalisations and deaths are “baked in” after coronavirus cases rose across the country.

He said the number of patients currently in hospital is related to infections from three weeks ago.

“As patients become ill with COVID-19

Read More

Soaring virus infection puts more French cities on alert

PARIS (AP) — Four French cities have joined Paris and Marseille in the maximum alert status to fight the spread of the coronavirus, and it appeared likely that the list would soon grow as infections soar.

Bars shut down and other severe measures are ordered under maximum alert.

Lyon, Grenoble and Saint-Etienne in the southeast and Lille in the north moved to maximum alert on Saturday when health authorities reported nearly 26,900 new daily infections in 24 hours. There were just under 5,000 new hospitalizations over the past week, with 928 of them in ICUs, and the positive rate for the increasing number of COVID-19 tests climbed to 11%. Nearly 32,690 coronavirus deaths have been counted in France, but the actual number is likely higher due to deaths at home and incomplete reporting from hospitals or rest homes.

While France girded itself for a climb in critical numbers, a consultation

Read More

Soaring Virus Infection Puts More French Cities on Alert | World News

PARIS (AP) — Four French cities have joined Paris and Marseille in the maximum alert status to fight the spread of the coronavirus, and it appeared likely that the list would soon grow as infections soar.

Bars shut down and other severe measures are ordered under maximum alert.

Lyon, Grenoble and Saint-Etienne in the southeast and Lille in the north moved to maximum alert on Saturday when health authorities reported nearly 26,900 new daily infections in 24 hours. There were just under 5,000 new hospitalizations over the past week, with 928 of them in ICUs, and the positive rate for the increasing number of COVID-19 tests climbed to 11%. Nearly 32,690 coronavirus deaths have been counted in France, but the actual number is likely higher due to deaths at home and incomplete reporting from hospitals or rest homes.

While France girded itself for a climb in critical numbers, a consultation

Read More

Trump no longer poses infection risk, White House doctor says

President Donald Trump “no longer poses an infection risk” to others and can safely end his isolation period, according to a memo released Saturday night by White House physician Sean Conley, just over a week after the president announced his Covid-19 diagnosis.

The doctor’s memo came hours after Trump made his first public appearance since his three-day hospital stay — and released an ad touting his recovery from the coronavirus.

Tests of samples taken Saturday morning from the president show that “by currently recognized standards, he is no longer considered a transmission risk,” Conley wrote. At ten days after he first developed symptoms, and after going fever-free for more than 24 hours, Trump met “CDC criteria” for ending isolation, the doctor added.

The CDC says that most patients should isolate for at least 10 days after the start of their symptoms, and can end isolation at or beyond that point

Read More

Australia’s Victoria state reaches lower infection milestone

SYDNEY (Reuters) – Australia’s city of Melbourne, capital of the coronavirus hotspot state of Victoria, on Wednesday reported the lowest two-week average of new cases after a second contagion wave that led to one of the world’s toughest lockdowns.

For the first time since the second coronavirus outbreak caused more than 800 deaths in the state – more than 90% of the country’s 897 virus-related deaths – the two-week average has fallen below 10.

The metric is key as officials in the second-most-populous state are reluctant to ease mobility restrictions until the rolling average in the two-week window falls below five.

“The strategy is working,” premier Daniel Andrews told reporters at his daily briefing. “Its success is pinned ultimately to whether symptomatic people come forward and get tested.”

Australia has so far reported more than 27,000 COVID-19 cases, with Victoria accounting for about 75% of infections. In the previous 24

Read More

The Health 202: Trump returns to White House as CDC says infection possible with social distance

The CDC officially said the virus can spread through aerosols — underscoring how easily it can be transmitted. 

A CDC Web page now acknowledges sometimes people can still get infected with the virus — even when they’re at least six feet apart.

“There is evidence that under certain conditions, people with COVID-19 seem to have infected others who were more than six feet away,” the updated page states. “These transmissions occurred within enclosed spaces that had inadequate ventilation. Sometimes the infected person was breathing heavily, for example while singing or exercising.

“Under these circumstances,” it says, “scientists believe that the amount of infectious smaller droplet and particles produced by the people with COVID-19 became concentrated enough to spread the virus to other people. The people who were infected were in the same space during the same time or shortly after the person with COVID-19 had left.” 

The latest guidance

Read More

Trump’s Doctors Report on His COVID Infection. Is He Sicker Than Thought? | Health News

By Robin Foster and E.J. Mundell
HealthDay Reporters

(HealthDay)

MONDAY, Oct. 5, 2020 (HealthDay News) — President Donald Trump’s doctors delivered an update of his condition on Sunday that suggested he might have more than just a mild case of COVID-19.

Based on the doctors’ accounts, Trump’s symptoms quickly escalated after he announced early Friday morning that he had tested positive for the coronavirus, The New York Times reported. He was taken to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center Friday evening.

Trump experienced a “high fever” on Friday, and there were two occasions when his blood oxygen levels dropped, on Friday and again on Saturday, the Times reported. Trump’s oxygen saturation level was 93% at one point, his doctors said. Ninety-five percent is considered the lower limit of the normal range.

Many medical experts consider patients to have severe COVID-19 if their oxygen levels drop below 94%, the Times reported.

Read More

Trump takes a brief car ride, ignoring own COVID infection

BETHESDA, Md. (AP) — Infected and contagious, President Donald Trump briefly ventured out in a motorcade on Sunday to salute cheering supporters, a move that disregarded precautions meant to contain the deadly virus that has forced his hospitalization and killed more than 209,000 Americans.

Hours earlier, Trump’s medical team reported that his blood oxygen level dropped suddenly twice in recent days and that they gave him a steroid typically only recommended for the very sick. Still, the doctors said Trump’s health is improving and that he could be discharged as early as Monday.

With one month until Election Day, Trump was eager to project strength despite his illness. The still-infectious president surprised supporters who had gathered outside Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, driving by in a black SUV with the windows rolled up. Secret Service agents inside the vehicle could be seen in masks and other protective gear.

The

Read More