Czechs to Tighten Coronavirus Measures as Infections Soar: PM | World News

PRAGUE (Reuters) – The Czech government will tighten coronavirus measures from Wednesday to curb soaring infections and hospitalisations but will seek to avoid the kind of blanket lockdown imposed in the spring, government officials said on Sunday.

The nation of 10.7 million has recorded Europe’s fastest rate of growth in new cases per capita in recent weeks after authorities eased most restrictions during the summer following a tough lockdown at the start of the pandemic.

“We have to decide on further measures, that will happen on Monday at the government session, and the measures will be effective from Wednesday,” Prime Minister Andrej Babis said in a video message on YouTube.

He did not give any details on the measures.

Finance Minister Alena Schillerova said earlier on Sunday that the government sought to avoid the complete lockdown the country experienced in spring.

“We don’t want to switch off the economy. We

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Czech Republic sees surge in new infections

PRAGUE — The Czech Republic and neighboring Slovakia have registered big jumps in new coronavirus infections, setting a new record for the fourth straight day.

The Health Ministry says the day-to-day increase reached 8,618 confirmed cases on Friday, over 3,000 more than the previous record set a day earlier in the nation of over 10 million.

The Czech Republic has had a total of 109,374 cases since the beginning of the pandemic with 905 deaths. Of those, almost 27,000 have tested positive in the first five days of this week while 146 have died this week, according to Saturday’s figures.

The government has responded to the record surge by imposing a series of new restrictive measures. Prime Minister Andrej Babis said on Friday he cannot rule out a lockdown of the entire country.

In Slovakia, the health ministry reported 1,887 new cases of infection on Friday, over 700 more than

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Sweden Tries to Isolate Covid-19 Cases Without a Lockdown as Infections Surge

Sweden, almost alone in Europe in rejecting a broad lockdown this spring, has introduced new guidelines to curb a surge in coronavirus infections but is sticking to its largely voluntary approach.

The Nordic country, which only had minor restrictions throughout its epidemic, had until recently been spared by the second wave of Covid-19 cases currently sweeping Europe. Authorities’ hopes that this was the result of collective immunity built as the disease spread rapidly through communities earlier in the year were dashed in recent days when a surge in new cases put Stockholm on track to reach last spring’s infection record.

The new measures, in force for less than a week, recommend that all members of a household should isolate for a week if one of them becomes infected. Those unable to work from home will be eligible for sick pay.

In addition, anyone experiencing cold-like symptoms such as a sore

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US reports most daily infections since mid August

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Celebrities and world leaders have mixed reactions upon finding out President Trump and first lady Melania have tested positive for COVID-19.

Wochit

The news of President Donald Trump and members of his inner circle testing positive for COVID-19 has sent shock waves across the country, but it’s not just the White House dealing with an onslaught of cases: Friday’s nationwide case count was the highest daily total in nearly two months.

There were 54,441 positive cases of the coronavirus reported on Friday, the highest single-day case count since Aug.14, when the country recorded just over 64,000 cases, per Johns Hopkins University data. 

The country’s daily cases peaked on July 16, when 77,362 positive tests were reported. 

Meanwhile, deaths have held relatively steady in recent weeks, as the weekly average is down a bit from a flare-up in late July and early August. Still, 906 Americans were announced dead from

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Quebec sees most new infections since early May, with 126 in schools; Manitoba reports record-high for active cases

On Thursday, Oct. 1, Quebec reported 933 new cases of COVID-19, the most in a 24-hour stretch since early May.

The update by Canada’s worst-hit province also included 126 new cases in schools that were identified among students and staff. Meanwhile in Ontario, 64 new infections in K-12 schools were reported, as its total province-wide case count increased by 538, which is part of a worrisome trend for the nation’s most populous jurisdiction.

In Manitoba, the province once again hit a new record-high for active cases, as those in its epicentre express their concern about long wait-times for testing. In Alberta, there are now 11 schools that have seen likely transmission within the learning facility. However, health officials are reminding the public that it’s a low percentage considering how many schools have had cases since they opened a month ago.

For more on Thursday’s top stories, and on how the

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Midwest sees spike in new COVID-19 infections

As the Midwest becomes the next COVID-19 hotspot, North Dakota is seeing some of the most pronounced spikes, with 21,401 confirmed positive cases, and a current testing positivity rate of 8.92 percent. 

Based on data from the state department of health, the daily new positive cases have been on a steady incline since the end of June and beginning of August, hitting a record high in September. 

Active hospitalizations have also increased over the same time period, with 105 COVID-19 patients currently hospitalized –– a record high.


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New positive COVID-19 infections down amid lower tests, active cases set record

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COVID-19 widespread testing is crucial to fighting the pandemic, but is there enough testing? The answer is in the positivity rates.

USA TODAY

The number of newly reported infections of coronavirus in South Dakotans fell Monday, as did the number of new tests, the South Dakota Department of Health reported.

New positive test results were reported for 198 people. A total or 1,455 new tests were reported, and 840 new unique people were tested. A dip in reported test results is not unusual for Mondays.

The number of people hospitalized in the state with COVID-19 fell by seven to 209. There were no additional deaths reported. So far 1,488 total South Dakotans have been hospitalized with COVID-19.

Secretary of Health Kim Malsam-Rysdon said Monday that 33 hospitals had COVID-19 patients, ranging from one to 40 patients. The state currently has more than 1,900 open beds.

Map: Where is coronavirus

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Ford says Ontario is in ‘second wave’; Quebec sees 171 new school infections

On Monday, Sept. 28, Ontario reported 700 new cases of COVID-19, the most in a 24-hour stretch since the start of the pandemic.

The update has led to Ontario Premier Doug Ford announcing to the province that it is officially in the “second wave” of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Ontario also reported 36 new cases in schools, while Quebec announced 171 new infections among students and staff. Seventy-nine new schools have also reported their first cases since the two provinces provided an update on Friday.

In total, Quebec announced 750 new cases, as it continues to lead all provinces in currently infected patients with 5,196.

In Yorkton, Sask., health officials believe that cases at its high school, hospital and the RCMP detachment are linked to a local fitness facility where there was an infectious individual. The highschool and RCMP detachment have since closed, while an outbreak has been declared at the

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‘Take Home’ Lawsuits Over COVID Infections Could Be Costly for U.S. Employers | Top News

(Reuters) – U.S. businesses with COVID-19 outbreaks are facing an emerging legal threat from claims that workers brought coronavirus home and infected relatives, which one risk analysis firm said could cost employers billions of dollars.

The daughter of Esperanza Ugalde of Illinois filed in August what lawyers believe is the first wrongful death “take home” lawsuit, alleging her mother died of COVID-19 that her father contracted at Aurora Packing Co’s meat processing plant.

    The cases borrow elements from “take home” asbestos litigation and avoid caps on liability for workplace injuries, exposing business to costly pain and suffering damages, even though the plaintiff never set foot on their premises.

“Businesses should be very concerned about these cases,” said labor and employment attorney Tom Gies of Crowell & Moring, which defends employers.

The lawsuit against Aurora alleges that Ricardo Ugalde worked “shoulder to shoulder” on the company’s processing line in April when

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‘Take home’ lawsuits over COVID infections could be costly for U.S. employers

By Tom Hals



a group of people in a field: FILE PHOTO: American flags representing 200,000 lives lost due to coronavirus are placed on National Mall in Washington


© Reuters/JOSHUA ROBERTS
FILE PHOTO: American flags representing 200,000 lives lost due to coronavirus are placed on National Mall in Washington

(Reuters) – U.S. businesses with COVID-19 outbreaks are facing an emerging legal threat from claims that workers brought coronavirus home and infected relatives, which one risk analysis firm said could cost employers billions of dollars.

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The daughter of Esperanza Ugalde of Illinois filed in August what lawyers believe is the first wrongful death “take home” lawsuit, alleging her mother died of COVID-19 that her father contracted at Aurora Packing Co’s meat processing plant.

    The cases borrow elements from “take home” asbestos litigation and avoid caps on liability for workplace injuries, exposing business to costly pain and suffering damages, even though the plaintiff never set foot on their premises.

“Businesses should be very concerned about these cases,” said labor and employment attorney Tom Gies of

Read More