Qatar- Aspetar book provides a unique insight into the world of sports medicine

(MENAFN – Gulf Times) Aspetar, the leading orthopaedic and sports medicine hospital, announced the launching of Aspetar Sports Medicine Collection, a special edition book created by the Aspetar Sports Medicine Journal, Aspetar.
This unique two-volume book brings around 200 articles which were written by more than 300 authors and carefully selected by the Editor-in-Chief, Prof Dr Nebojsa Popovic, and his co-editors. Volume 1 focuses on topics in sports science, medicine of sport, and exercise & lifestyle medicine, whilst Volume 2 addresses subjects relevant to injuries of the upper and lower extremity.
With more than 1,400 pages, Aspetar Sports Medicine Collection aims to help its readers, whether they are medical professionals, coaches or students, improve their understanding of sports medicine to make better-informed decisions in assisting the athletes.
Through its new publication, Aspetar aims to appeal to a wide range of readers interested in the sports and medical fields and to

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Insight from sports medicine leads to discovery about mussels in acidifying ocean

Shannon Meseck, a NOAA Fisheries research chemist and marathon runner, was initially interested in how ultra-runners can tolerate higher levels of carbon dioxide than non-athletes. A chance conversation with a medical doctor about ciliated cells in the human lung turned on a light bulb in her head. Could similarities between the function of these cells in humans and in blue mussels explain the mussels’ response to increasing acidification in the ocean?

Blue mussels, one of the mollusks Meseck studies, are economically and environmentally important filter-feeding bivalves. Like other bivalves, they use their gills for feeding and respiration. Gill cilia–microscopic, hair-like structures–create and control the current that allows water and food to flow over the gills. The cilia also help capture and sort food particles.

Similar ciliated cells in the human lung have receptors that sense the environment, including carbon dioxide concentration. They signal responses that can include changes in cilia

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