As Globe Gallops Into Vaccine Trials, Insurers Remain Unfazed | Top News

By Noor Zainab Hussain, Carolyn Cohn and Ludwig Burger

LONDON/FRANKFURT (Reuters) – The world is racing towards a vaccine in record time, stirring public concerns about safety to the extent that nine leading developers have felt compelled to issue a pledge to uphold scientific standards and testing rigour.

Yet, while more than 40 experimental COVID-19 vaccines are being tested on humans, the insurance companies with decades of experience in assessing the risks of clinical trials don’t see anything to be unduly concerned about.

Executives at insurer Allianz and brokers Gallagher and Marsh, among the leading players in clinical trials insurance, told Reuters that premiums had only marginally increased so far in the current pandemic.

They argued there was little structural difference to trials carried out in the past, despite drugmakers around the world competing to shatter the fastest time in history for developing a vaccine, which stands at around four

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Health Insurers Lay Groundwork For Biden And ‘Medicare Advantage At 60’

Health insurance companies are expanding Medicare Advantage health plan offerings to seniors in hundreds of new counties for 2021 as new regulations allow for new benefits and the program becomes more popular.

But these health plans could also be establishing a beachhead for perhaps an even bigger draw of seniors if a Joe Biden White House successfully convinces Congress to lower the eligibility of Medicare to 60.

As the presidential campaign heats up in its final month, Biden is stepping up talk

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Some Insurers Stop Waiving Fees or Deductibles for Telemedicine

Some people will have to start paying more out of their own pockets for telemedicine appointments, if their virtual visits with doctors are unrelated to Covid-19 and are needed to monitor conditions like diabetes or to check out sudden knee pain.

Two of the largest health insurers, Anthem and UnitedHealthcare, are no longer waiving co-payments and deductibles for some customers beginning on Oct. 1. People who have been relying on telehealth to steer clear of the emergency room or a doctor’s office during the coronavirus pandemic will need to check with their insurers to see how much they will now owe for a virtual visit.

Just how much people who paid nothing before will now have to pay will vary widely, depending on the type of visit and the details of their insurance policy. But you might have the same $25 co-payment to see your doctor over video as you

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