In debate, Kamala Harris says she won’t take COVID vaccine just on Trump’s say-so

Sen. Kamala Harris of California said during Wednesday night’s vice presidential debate with Vice President Mike Pence that she does not trust the administration’s push to rush a coronavirus vaccine into production.

“If the public health professionals, if Dr. [Anthony] Fauci, if the doctors tell us that we should take it, I’ll be the first in line to take it. Absolutely,” Harris said during the live debate in Salt Lake City, when she was asked if Americans should take a vaccine, if the Trump administration were to approve one either before or after the election. “But if Donald Trump tells us that we should take it. I’m not taking it.”

The debate moderator, Susan Page, asked Pence a different question, but Pence took the opportunity to respond to Harris.

The Democratic nominee for vice president, Sen. Kamala Harris, speaks during the debate in Kingsbury Hall at the University of Utah on Oct. 7, in Salt Lake City. (Photo by Robyn Beck/AFP via Getty Images)
The Democratic nominee for vice president, Sen. Kamala Harris, speaks during the debate in Kingsbury Hall at the University of Utah
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Vice presidential debate: Kamala Harris claims she won’t take vaccine if Trump recommends

Democratic vice presidential candidate Kamala Harris said Wednesday that she would not take a vaccine recommended by President Trump during a heated debate clash over the White House’s response to the coronavirus pandemic.

Harris accused Vice President Mike Pence, head of the Trump administration’s coronavirus task force, of failing to disclose critical information to Americans in the early days of the pandemic. When asked about a poll showing half of Americans would not take a vaccine as soon as it is available, Harris indicated that she was skeptical of Trump’s involvement in the rollout of a potential vaccine.

“If the public health professionals, if Dr. Fauci, if the doctors tell us we should take it, I’ll be the first in line to take it, absolutely,” Harris said. “But if Donald Trump tells us we should take it, I’m not taking it.”

Harris, citing a recent report from Washington Post journalist

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Kamala Harris Doesn’t Trust Trump’s Word on Vaccines. She’s Not Alone

Democratic vice presidential candidate Kamala Harris questioned Donald Trump’s word on a potential COVID-19 vaccine in Wednesday’s debate, and polling suggests she is not alone in distrusting the president on this point.



Kamala Harris sitting at a table: Democratic vice presidential nominee Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) participates in the vice presidential debate against U.S. Vice President Mike Pence at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, on October 7, 2020.


© Alex Wong/Getty
Democratic vice presidential nominee Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA) participates in the vice presidential debate against U.S. Vice President Mike Pence at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City, on October 7, 2020.

Harris was asked whether she would take a vaccine if one were approved by the Trump administration, during her head-to-head with Vice President Mike Pence on Wednesday.

“If the public health professionals, if Dr. Fauci, if the doctors tell us we should take it, I’ll be the first in line to take it, absolutely,” she said. “But if Donald Trump tells us we should take it, I’m not taking it.”

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Kamala Harris’s and Mike Pence’s Debate Body Language, Decoded by an Expert

In Salt Lake City on Wednesday evening, Vice President Mike Pence and Senator Kamala Harris sat approximately six feet away from each other, behind plexiglass shields, and had a battle of crooked brows, smirks, and head shakes.

There were fewer interruptions — though Pence still managed cut off Harris enough times to get at least one good meme out of the moment — but more rogue flies than last week’s debate between Vice President Joe Biden and President Donald Trump. However, it was those in-between moments that caught our attention.

Body language expert Patti Wood, author of Snap: Making the Most of First Impressions, Body Language and Charisma, spoke with InStyle late Wednesday evening after the debate to discuss those cocked heads, the smug smiles, and what it all means.

The Smirks

Both Senator Harris and Vice President Pence smirked plenty while the other was talking during the debate

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Kamala Harris Says She Wouldn’t Trust a Vaccine Trump Recommended

Citing the Trump administration’s handling of the COVID-19 pandemic, Kamala Harris said that she’d happily take a vaccine that doctors and scientists recommend — but absolutely not one touted by Donald Trump.

Asked at Wednesday’s vice-presidential debate whether she would take a vaccine approved by the Trump administration before or after the election, Harris said she’d be the “first in line” to take the vaccine if health experts like Dr. Anthony Fauci recommended it.

“If the public health professionals, if Dr. Fauci, if the doctors tell us that we should take it, I’ll be the first in line to take it, absolutely. But if Donald Trump tells us that we should take it, I’m not taking it,” Harris said.

Also Read: New England Journal of Medicine Blasts Trump Administration’s ‘Dangerously Incompetent’ Pandemic Response

Harris’ one-liner didn’t happen in a vacuum of course. They come after the Trump administration has in

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Fact-checking the 2020 vice presidential debate between Mike Pence and Kamala Harris

Vice President Mike Pence and Democratic his Democratic challenger, California Sen. Kamala Harris, face off in Salt Lake City Wednesday night for the lone 2020 vice presidential debate.

The live, 90-minute debate, moderated by USA Today Washington Bureau chief Susan Page, touched on the coronavirus, the economy, climate change, the Supreme Court and more.

Below, ABC News will fact check what both candidates say. Refresh for the latest updates.

PHOTO: Vice President Mike Pence and Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris arrive for the vice presidential debate in Kingsbury Hall at the University of Utah, Oct. 7, 2020, in Salt Lake City.

Vice President Mike Pence and Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris arrive for the vice presidential debate in Kingsbury Hall at the University of Utah, Oct. 7, 2020, in Salt Lake City.

Vice President Mike Pence and Democratic vice presidential nominee Kamala Harris arrive for the vice presidential debate in Kingsbury Hall at the University of Utah, Oct. 7, 2020, in Salt Lake City.

Pence misleads when comparing COVID-19 pandemic to H1N1, Obama administration response

PENCE’S CLAIM: “We actually do know

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‘My Experience With Fibroids Is Why I’m Supporting Kamala Harris’

When I was in my late twenties, I decided that I was going to donate my eggs. I had learned about egg donation through a friend whose aunt was going through the IVF process, and I thought it was a wonderful way to help a couple who was in need.

At the time I wasn’t 100 percent sure that I wasn’t going to have children, but I was already leaning toward no. So I researched the egg donation process and decided to go through with it in order to aid a couple who had that yearning that I didn’t have. But while preparing to undergo the process, the doctor retrieving the eggs made a discovery: I had fibroids growing inside of my uterus.

The doctor told me not to worry about them for the time being, but that eventually I might have to get them removed, and so at the

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Watch live: Kamala Harris, Mike Pence go head-to-head in vice presidential debate

Oct. 7 (UPI) — Sen. Kamala Harris and Vice President Mike Pence are preparing to square off in their first and only debate Wednesday night, which will be staged with expanded COVID-19 safety precautions just days after President Donald Trump was diagnosed with the coronavirus.

The debate is scheduled for 7 p.m. MDT at Kingsbury Hall at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City and will be broadcast live nationally.

As of early Wednesday, though, the Commission on Presidential Debates was working to iron out details for the safety measures. Trump announced he’d tested positive for the virus a little more than two days after he participated in a debate with Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden.

The commission has said that Harris and Pence will be spaced 12 feet apart for their debate, instead of the 7 feet originally planned.

Since the spring, the Centers for Disease Control and

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