Fitness Coalition, LI Law Firm Spearhead Lawsuit Against Cuomo

SYOSSET, NY —Two weeks after Michigan’s Supreme Court overturned the continued emergency executive orders of Gov. Whitmer, a coalition of business owners on Long Island are hoping their own lawsuit will achieve the same result in New York.

The New York Fitness Coalition, an advocacy group of gym owners who came together during the coronavirus pandemic, is leading the class-action lawsuit. A news conference to announce the lawsuit is being held Wednesday at the Sysosset office of The Mermigas Law Group, P.C.

Charlie Cassara founded the New York Fitness Coalition, which sued Gov. Cuomo in July, seeking an injunction of Cuomo’s orders in order for gyms to reopen. This lawsuit, Cassara, says is a broader effort to declare the extended emergency executive orders that Cuomo uses to mandate the COVID-19 business and school regulations as unconstitutional and illegal.

“This wasn’t his job,” Cassara told Patch. Once the original aims of

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What Is Proposition 23, The Dialysis Clinics Law?

LOS ANGELES, CA — California voters can be forgiven a sense of deja vu, having voted down a law governing dialysis clinics just two years ago. But the 2018 measure and this year’s Proposition 23 are fundamentally different.

Voters in 2018 rejected Prop 8, which sought to cap dialysis clinic profits. Proposition 23, focuses on patient safety and clinic oversight.

So what exactly would Prop 23 do?

It would require dialysis clinics to have a doctor or nurse practitioner onhand when patients are being treated, and it would require clinics to report patient infections to the state and federal government. It would also prohibit clinics from closing without state approval and prohibit them turning away patients because of their source of payment.

Opponents of the measure argue that these requirements are unnecessary and costly. Clinics would be forced to close down, and patients will lose access to the care they

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How patent law and medicine regulations could affect New Zealand’s access to a COVID-19 vaccine

New Zealand has allocated an undisclosed sum, in the order of hundreds of millions of dollars, to access COVID-19 vaccines when they become available.

The funding is on top of a NZ$37 million vaccine strategy, but the government has not released specifics because of commercial sensitivities that “could prevent the best possible deal for New Zealanders”.

Apart from the intricacies of global efforts to develop, test and distribute a vaccine, there are also domestic legal issues the government might need to consider, particularly in patent law and the regulatory review of medicines.

Legislative changes to future-proof the law could avoid delays and lower access costs.

Patent law and access

Some fear pharmaceutical companies could patent a COVID-19 vaccine and hold the world hostage, demanding monopoly prices.

But to get a patent the invention has to be novel and non-obvious. There is possibly enough public information about vaccines currently under investigation

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Trump seems to blame military, law enforcement for coronavirus diagnosss

But in the hours after we learned that close aide Hope Hicks had tested positive for the coronavirus and before we learned Trump himself had it, he offered some strange comments that seemed to lay the groundwork for how he could explain his impending diagnosis: It might have come from the military or law enforcement.

“You know, it’s very hard, when you’re with soldiers, when you’re with airmen, when you’re with Marines, and I’m with — and the police officers,” Trump said. “I’m with them so much. And when they come over here, it’s very hard to say, stay back, stay back. It’s a tough kind of a situation.”

Trump then turned to his own test and to Hicks. “So, I just went for a test, and we will see what happens. I mean, who knows? But you know her very well. She’s fantastic. And she’s done a great job.”

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Fatal cases of COVID-19 at nursing facilities prompt new California law

Patients were moved from Riverside's Magnolia Rehabilitation and Nursing Center in April after staff failed to show up. Gov. Gavin Newsom has signed a law requiring the reporting of deaths during health emergencies. <span class="copyright">(Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Patients were moved from Riverside’s Magnolia Rehabilitation and Nursing Center in April after staff failed to show up. Gov. Gavin Newsom has signed a law requiring the reporting of deaths during health emergencies. (Gina Ferazzi / Los Angeles Times)

With skilled nursing homes hit particularly hard by the COVID-19 pandemic, Gov. Gavin Newsom on Tuesday signed a law requiring those facilities in California to report disease-related deaths to health authorities within 24 hours during declared emergencies.

The law was written in response to concerns that health agencies were slow to respond to outbreaks in skilled nursing facilities because they did not receive timely information about them.

So far, more than 5,630 residents and staff at skilled nursing facilities in the state have died from COVID-19 — 36% of California’s fatalities from the coronavirus. The percentage “reveals the significant weaknesses in the reporting system currently required by these facilities,” said Assemblyman

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Beijing passes law to protect medical whistleblowers

Beijing’s city government will protect “non-malicious” medical whistleblowers under a new law, passed months after a Chinese doctor was punished for sounding the alarm at the very beginning of the Covid-19 pandemic.

China’s leaders suffered a rare wave of public outrage after ophthalmologist Li Wenliang died of the disease in Wuhan, the city where the coronavirus first emerged late last year.

He had attempted to warn authorities about the new infection but was instead reprimanded for “spreading rumours”.

Other medical whistleblowers in Wuhan later told Chinese media they were punished by government officials for discussing the outbreak without permission from superiors. 

The new Beijing law, which came into effect from Friday, states that anyone whose tip-offs are later verified would be rewarded, and suffer no penalties. 

But the regulations do not cover anyone “fabricating or deliberately disseminating false information” about developing public health emergencies, according to a government notice on

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Landmark – The Inside Story of America’s New Health Care Law and What It Means for Us All

Book Review: Landmark – The inside story of America’s new health care law and what it means for us all

Landmark is a collection of essays written by various reporters, editors and national staff of ‘Washington Post’ followed by the actual text of the bill. It provides a comprehensible summary of the legislation and examines its impacts on Americans on various categories and on health care system as a whole. In addition to this, it gives a very rich historical background and perspective. Such as how the legislation came together, the events and negotiations, the political challenges and obstacles, etc etc

The book has a systematic structure and is divided into three sections. The first section provides behind the scene reporting about the way the law came up. The second section highlights the effects and impacts of the new law whereas the third section is a summary of the legislation.… Read More