Johnson & Johnson Paying Over $100 Million To Settle Baby Powder Lawsuits: Report

Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) appears to be reaching deep into its coffers to settle a clutch of lawsuits. According to an article published on Monday by Bloomberg and citing “people with knowledge of the pacts,” the healthcare giant has agreed to pay over $100 million to settle more than 1,000 lawsuits over its Johnson’s Baby Powder.

The lawsuits, some of which stretch back several years, allege that repeated use of the talc-based powder caused cancer. Some claimants say that the product is tainted with asbestos, a substance notorious for causing the illness.

That $100 million would only be an initial outlay; according to regulatory filings, the total number of lawsuits pending is around 20,000. Several have already been resolved, with substantial awards. One, completed in 2018, saw a court ordered Johnson & Johnson to pay $4.7 billion, although this was significantly reduced to $2.1 billion on appeal. Other lawsuits have

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Pfizer, BioNTech, Regeneron Hit With Patent Lawsuits Over COVID-19 Drugs And Vaccines

Three top names in the fight against the coronavirus and the COVID-19 disease that can result from it have been sued for patent infringement. The trio includes Regeneron Pharmaceuticals (NASDAQ:REGN), Pfizer (NYSE:PFE), and BioNTech (NASDAQ:BNTX). The plaintiff is privately held Allele Biotechnology and Pharmaceuticals.

Allele alleges that the three all used its mNeonGreen fluorescent protein to develop their COVID-19 products without paying royalties for the substance. Medical researchers inject fluorescent proteins into cells to track reactions within those bodies. This tracking is used to help determine the effect of medicines and vaccines on the body.

Regeneron is currently developing REGN-COV2, an experimental cocktail of two antibodies to treat COVID-19. The company became a hot topic last week when it was revealed President Donald Trump was administered REGN-COV2 as part of his treatment for COVID-19.

Pfizer and BioNTech have teamed up to develop a coronavirus vaccine; their candidate, BNT162b2, is considered

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‘Take Home’ Lawsuits Over COVID Infections Could Be Costly for U.S. Employers | Top News

(Reuters) – U.S. businesses with COVID-19 outbreaks are facing an emerging legal threat from claims that workers brought coronavirus home and infected relatives, which one risk analysis firm said could cost employers billions of dollars.

The daughter of Esperanza Ugalde of Illinois filed in August what lawyers believe is the first wrongful death “take home” lawsuit, alleging her mother died of COVID-19 that her father contracted at Aurora Packing Co’s meat processing plant.

    The cases borrow elements from “take home” asbestos litigation and avoid caps on liability for workplace injuries, exposing business to costly pain and suffering damages, even though the plaintiff never set foot on their premises.

“Businesses should be very concerned about these cases,” said labor and employment attorney Tom Gies of Crowell & Moring, which defends employers.

The lawsuit against Aurora alleges that Ricardo Ugalde worked “shoulder to shoulder” on the company’s processing line in April when

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‘Take home’ lawsuits over COVID infections could be costly for U.S. employers

By Tom Hals



a group of people in a field: FILE PHOTO: American flags representing 200,000 lives lost due to coronavirus are placed on National Mall in Washington


© Reuters/JOSHUA ROBERTS
FILE PHOTO: American flags representing 200,000 lives lost due to coronavirus are placed on National Mall in Washington

(Reuters) – U.S. businesses with COVID-19 outbreaks are facing an emerging legal threat from claims that workers brought coronavirus home and infected relatives, which one risk analysis firm said could cost employers billions of dollars.

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The daughter of Esperanza Ugalde of Illinois filed in August what lawyers believe is the first wrongful death “take home” lawsuit, alleging her mother died of COVID-19 that her father contracted at Aurora Packing Co’s meat processing plant.

    The cases borrow elements from “take home” asbestos litigation and avoid caps on liability for workplace injuries, exposing business to costly pain and suffering damages, even though the plaintiff never set foot on their premises.

“Businesses should be very concerned about these cases,” said labor and employment attorney Tom Gies of

Read More