As COVID-19 cases rise again, how will the US respond? Here’s what states have learned so far

<span class="caption">States have tried shutting down bars and limiting restaurants to outdoor seating to slow the coronavirus's spread.</span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="http://gettyimages.com/detail/news-photo/patrons-dine-at-an-outdoor-restaurant-along-5th-avenue-in-news-photo/1227674724" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images">Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images</a></span>
States have tried shutting down bars and limiting restaurants to outdoor seating to slow the coronavirus’s spread. Sandy Huffaker/Getty Images

When COVID-19 began spreading in the U.S. in early spring, governors in hard-hit states took drastic steps to reduce the threat and avoid overloading their health care systems. By shutting down nonessential businesses and schools and ordering people to stay home, they slowed the virus’s spread, but several million people lost jobs.

Since then, we’ve witnessed a series of ad hoc experiments with more targeted approaches. As states started to reopen, they tested different levels of restrictions, such as face mask mandates and capacity constraints on restaurants. Some closed bars when cases rose again but left other businesses open. Others set restrictions that would be triggered only for hot spots when a county’s positive case numbers passed a certain threshold.

Now, as cooler weather moves more people indoors and daily

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The big lesson Suze Orman learned from her recent health scare

Suze Orman leaving the hospital in July 2020, after surgery to remove a tumor from her spine.

Source: Kathy Travis

Suze Orman didn’t take her own advice, at least when it came to her health.

The New York Times best-selling author and personal finance expert had emergency surgery in July for a tumor on her spinal cord, after ignoring some troubling signs for several months prior.

“With money, the reason we don’t do the things we know we need to do is because we are afraid,” Orman said. “We are afraid of making mistakes.

“I was in that mode, but with my health,” added Orman,  who is 69 and said she “should have known better.”

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“But it is hard

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Lesson not learned: Europe unprepared as 2nd virus wave hits

ROME — Europe’s second wave of coronavirus infections has struck well before flu season even started, with intensive care wards filling up again and bars shutting down. Making matters worse, authorities say, is a widespread case of “COVID-fatigue.”

Record high daily infections in several eastern European countries and sharp rebounds in the hard-hit west have made clear that Europe never really crushed the COVID-19 curve as hoped, after springtime lockdowns.

Spain this week declared a state of emergency for Madrid amid increasing tensions between local and national authorities over virus containment measures. Germany offered up soldiers to help with contact tracing in newly flaring hotspots. Italy mandated masks outdoors and warned that for the first time since the country became the European epicenter of the pandemic, the health system was facing “significant critical issues” as hospitals fill up.

The Czech Republic’s “Farewell Covid” party in June, when thousands of Prague

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With 2,000 dead, Minn. health leaders consider what state has learned, lost

The COVID-19 pandemic has inundated people with waves of numbers about infections and positivity rates and diagnostic test performance, but the milestone Minnesota reached this weekend is sobering.

Two thousand deaths.

That’s the population of Hinckley, Eyota, or Warroad.

“Two thousand is a big number,” said Dr. Rahul Koranne of the Minnesota Hospital Association. “That’s heartbreaking.”

Minnesota took about two months to reach its first 1,000 COVID-19 deaths in late May, but then four months to reach the next 1,000 — a slowdown that reflects changes in the spread of the virus, improvements in oxygen management of hospitalized patients, and interventions that cut outbreaks in long-term care facilities that were particularly deadly.

State health leaders paused silently at a meeting Friday to absorb the death toll and contemplate what Minnesota has learned amid the pandemic and what it has lost.

“We want to acknowledge the positives, but I also think

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