Eli Lilly Seeks FDA Approval On Coronavirus Treatment, Potentially Easing Rush For A Vaccine

KEY POINTS

  • Eli Lilly’s three trials over the summer yielded positive results in patients with mild- to moderate-cases of coronavirus
  • The company could have nearly 1 million doses ready for distribution by the end of 2020 with FDA approval
  • Temporary protections provided by the antibody treatment could potentially give pharmaceutical companies more time to develop stronger vaccines

Pharmaceutical company Eli Lilly & Co. asked the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Wednesday to authorize the use of a potential coronavirus treatment that’s shown promising results during clinical trials.

Eli Lilly asked the FDA to authorize the drug’s emergency use after results for their first three clinical trials all came back positive in people with mild- to moderate-cases of coronavirus. If approved, Eli Lilly said it could have 100,000 doses ready to go within a month and 1 million ready by the end of 2020.

However, it would not be used on

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Eli Lilly Applies For Emergency Approval For Covid-19 Antibodies

The US biotech firm Eli Lilly on Wednesday announced it was seeking an emergency use authorization (EUA) for its lab-produced antibody treatments against Covid-19, after early trial results showed they reduced viral load, symptoms and hospitalization rates.

“Our teams have worked tirelessly the last seven months to discover and develop these potential antibody treatments,” said Daniel Skovronsky, Lilly’s chief scientific officer.

“Lilly is diligently working with regulators around the world to make these treatments available,” he added.

The company said in a statement that its “combination therapy” of two antibodies working together was shown to be effective in a placebo-controlled study of 268 patients with mild to moderate Covid-19.

Their analysis showed the proportion of patients with high viral load at day 7 of their illness was 3.0 percent on the therapy, compared to 20.8 percent on the placebo arm.

Improvement in symptoms was seen as early as three days

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