Scientists Study The Long Term Health Effects Of Wildfire Smoke : Shots

Smoke blankets Mill City, Oregon, which was evacuated for days following the nearby Beachie Creek Fire.

Nathan Rott/NPR


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Nathan Rott/NPR

Smoke blankets Mill City, Oregon, which was evacuated for days following the nearby Beachie Creek Fire.

Nathan Rott/NPR

Ariel Kinzinger had a headache. Clark Brinkman coughed and wheezed. LaNesha Collins, feeling physically fine, was frustrated by another day mostly trapped inside looking out at a sepia sun, in Portland, Ore.

“I’ve never been in the thick of smoke like this,” said Collins, an Oregonian like the others. “It’s insane.”

In recent weeks, tens of millions of Americans have lived and breathed through a thick haze of wildfire smoke. In places, it lasted for weeks. The immediate health effects of that are well known to the medical community and anyone who’s been exposed: Eyes sting, throats tighten, snot can turn black.

Respiratory problems like asthma and chronic

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Newlywed, mom ‘COVID long haulers’ battle debilitating symptoms months later

Doctors say they’re bracing for a “tsunami” of “COVID long haulers”

As the coronavirus pandemic continues across the U.S., experts are noticing another wave of the pandemic with what they’re calling “COVID long-haulers,” or people suffering debilitating symptoms months after having the coronavirus.

Doctors say they are seeing many people who have recovered from COVID but are finding themselves still not well.

Caitlin Barber, a 27-year-old newlywed, is one of these “COVID long haulers,” who led a healthy lifestyle with her husband and spent time training as a runner. She was also a dietician at a nursing home.

Caitlin Barber poses for a photo after a marathon.

Caitlin Barber poses for a photo after a marathon.

Caitlin Barber poses for a photo after a marathon.

“We were living the newlywed dream, you know and loving life,” Barber told “Good Morning America.”

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‘Long Covid’ sufferers struggle to return to work

From migraines to fatigue, coronavirus patients say they are continuing to suffer debilitating symptoms months after first becoming infected, in what has become known as “long Covid.” 



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© Provided by CNBC


Claire Twomey, 33, a social worker in County Meath, Ireland, told CNBC via telephone that it was in her first week back at work, around six weeks after she first became ill with the coronavirus, that her symptoms re-emerged. 

She initially thought she had become re-infected with the virus when the headaches came back, followed by a fever, coughing and shortness of breath. But hospital tests found no underlying issues, she said. 

Twomey said she felt “absolutely floored” when the symptoms re-emerged. “I was back in bed, I couldn’t even read a book or watch TV for longer than half an hour.” 

More “insane, weird (and) strange” symptoms appeared in this relapse with the illness, including gastrointestinal issues,

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AIM ImmunoTech Announces IRB Approval to Enroll COVID-19 ‘Long Haulers’ in the AMP-511 ME/CFS Clinical Trial of Ampligen

COVID-19 Patients May Continue to Experience Chronic Fatigue-Like Symptoms

Charles Lapp, MD

Charles Lapp, MD, at a recent AIM ImmunoTech Inc. planning meeting on COVID-19-induced chronic fatigue in ‘Long Haulers,’ at the Hunter-Hopkins Center, Charlotte, N.C.
Charles Lapp, MD, at a recent AIM ImmunoTech Inc. planning meeting on COVID-19-induced chronic fatigue in ‘Long Haulers,’ at the Hunter-Hopkins Center, Charlotte, N.C.
Charles Lapp, MD, at a recent AIM ImmunoTech Inc. planning meeting on COVID-19-induced chronic fatigue in ‘Long Haulers,’ at the Hunter-Hopkins Center, Charlotte, N.C.

OCALA, Fla., Oct. 06, 2020 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — AIM ImmunoTech Inc. (NYSE American: AIM) is pleased to announce that it has received Institutional Review Board (IRB) approval for the expansion of the AMP-511 Expanded Access Program (EAP) clinical trial for Myalgic Encephalomyelitis/Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (ME/CFS) to include patients previously diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2, but who still demonstrate chronic fatigue-like symptoms. Patients in the trial are treated with AIM’s flagship pipeline drug Ampligen.

These patients — commonly referred to as Post-COVID-19 Chronic Fatigue (PCCF) / “Long Haulers” because of the persistence of

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An ‘exhausted’ Trump’s long path to coronavirus

When President Donald Trump stepped into the dining room of his golf club in New Jersey on Thursday, high-dollar attendees gathered for a fundraiser there thought he seemed a little off.



a man wearing a suit and tie: US President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump step off Air Force One upon arrival at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport in Cleveland, Ohio on September 29, 2020. - President Trump is in Cleveland, Ohio for the first of three presidential debates.


© Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images
US President Donald Trump and First Lady Melania Trump step off Air Force One upon arrival at Cleveland Hopkins International Airport in Cleveland, Ohio on September 29, 2020. – President Trump is in Cleveland, Ohio for the first of three presidential debates.

Subdued from a week of campaigning, maybe. Hoarse from a string of large rallies. Perhaps a little pale underneath the crystal chandeliers.

“Exhausted,” described one person who saw him.

Little could those guests know that the tired-sounding man sitting across the white brocade tablecloth would test positive, hours later, for coronavirus.

Nor were they aware that before he arrived, both Trump and his senior aides received information suggesting he could have been

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Irregular, long periods linked to shorter life span in 24-year study

In a finding that suggests a woman’s periods might be a powerful indicator of her general health, researchers report that women with irregular and long menstrual cycles face a higher risk of early death.

In a study that spanned 24 years and included more than 79,000 premenopausal women who had no history of heart disease, cancer or diabetes, those who’d always had irregular menstrual cycles were more likely to die before the age of 70 than those who had regular cycles.

“The important point illustrated by this study is that menstrual regularity and reproductive health provides a window into overall long-term health,” Dr. Adam Balen, a professor of reproductive medicine at Leeds Teaching Hospitals in Britain, told CNN.

“Young women with irregular periods need a thorough assessment, not only of their hormones and metabolism but also of their lifestyle so that they can be advised about steps that they can

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How Long Could I Be Contagious Before a Positive Virus Test? | Science News

How long could I be contagious before a positive virus test?

Studies have shown that people may be contagious for about two days before developing COVID-19 symptoms.

In fact, right before developing symptoms is when people are likely the most contagious, said Dr. Werner Bischoff, an infectious disease specialist at Wake Forest University.

People who never develop symptoms can spread infection, too. That’s a problem because many people would never seek testing unless they developed symptoms or knew they’d been exposed.

But there’s a more complicated part to this question: What if someone knows they were exposed but their virus test comes back negative — could they still be contagious?

A negative test within less than seven days after exposure “is a very, very poor indicator of whether you have virus on board,” said Dr. Alan Wells of the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

Some tests are less accurate than

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35-year study hints that coronavirus immunity doesn’t last long

Coronaviruses that cause the common cold can infect people repeatedly, hinting that immunity to the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19 might be similarly short-lived.



a close up of a flower: coronavirus being surrounded on left side by antibody molecules


© Provided by Live Science
coronavirus being surrounded on left side by antibody molecules

In a new study, published Sept. 14 in the journal Nature Medicine, scientists monitored 10 individuals for more than 35 years to determine how often they became infected with the four known seasonal coronaviruses. Since these viruses — known as HCoV-NL63, HCoV-229E, HCoV-OC43 and HCoV-HKU1 — either cause mild symptoms of the common cold or no symptoms at all, the team periodically screened the participants’ blood for antibodies to spot new cases of infection. 

When blood samples show an increase in the number of antibodies targeting a specific virus, as compared with prior samples, that means that the person’s immune system is fighting off a new infection. The researchers determined how

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How long to manifest and when to test

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), or sexually transmitted infections (STIs), usually pass from person to person through sexual contact. Testing can help make sex safer and ensure people receive proper treatment for STIs

Each STI has its own incubation period, which is how long it takes for symptoms to appear. In some cases, it can take months for an STI to show up on tests. In other cases, it may only take days.

This article explores the incubation periods of different STIs, how soon people can get tested, and the importance of testing.

The incubation period is how long it takes for symptoms to appear after exposure. The window period is how long it takes to get a positive test result for the infection after exposure. These periods are often similar.

Some general symptoms that indicate a person might have an STI include:

  • genital itching or burning
  • pain during intercourse or
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Preferred Podiatry Group (PPG) Stands Ready to Deliver Much Needed Care to Residents in Long Term Care (LTC) Communities

CHICAGO, Sept. 29, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Preferred Podiatry Group (PPG) welcomes recent guidance from CMS and State-based Agencies that request that Long Term Care (LTC) Communities allow healthcare workers like Podiatrists to deliver care to patients in need.

“Over the past several weeks, I have seen residents in dire need of podiatric care,” said Dr. Brian Leykum, Regional Medical Director at PPG. “The postponement of Podiatry visits has led to a noticeable increase in wounds and infections. Thickened, overgrown nails and calluses have also altered the way many residents ambulate, altering their gait and increasing their chance of falling.”

PPG remains steadfast in providing much needed Podiatric care to residents in need throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Our team implemented strict infection control protocols to ensure the health and safety of staff and residents at LTC Communities.

“We have been shipping our Podiatrists adequate supplies of PPE so our

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