Coronavirus may live much longer than the flu virus on smartphone screens

The virus that causes COVID-19 can stay active on smooth surfaces like smartphones, metal surfaces and paper money for much longer than the flu virus, according to researchers from Australia’s national science agency. They found that it can remain viable for up to 28 days, albeit in a very controlled environment. Under the same conditions, the influenza virus remains infectious for just 17 days, according to the study.

The team said the research proves that the coronavirus is “extremely robust” compared to other viruses. “These findings demonstrate SARS-CoV-2 can remain infectious for significantly longer time periods than generally considered possible,” the study concludes. (Cloth and other porous surfaces can carry infectious virus for just half the time, or around 14 days.)

While it shows the importance of cleaning and disinfecting phones and other surfaces, the study comes with some large caveats. It was conducted at a constant 68 degree F

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Doctor says Trump no longer a transmission risk to others

The White House did not say, however, if the president has tested negative for the virus

On Saturday night, a little over a week after President Donald Trump announced his COVID-19 diagnosis, White House physician Sean Conley released a memo stating that the president “no longer poses an infection risk” to others.

The White House did not say, however, if the president has tested negative for the virus.

“This evening I am happy to report that, in addition to the President meeting the CDC criteria for the safe discontinuation of isolation, this morning’s COVID PCR sample demonstrates, by currently recognized standards, he is no longer considered a transmission risk to others,” Conley wrote in the memo.

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According to The Hill, the White House has not provided the exact date when the president last tested negative for COVID-19. But Conley’s memo gives Trump permission to resume holding public gatherings.

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Trump No Longer a COVID-19 ‘Transmission Risk,’ White House Doctor Says

President Trump is no longer at risk of transmitting the coronavirus, his doctor said Saturday evening, nine days after the president first tested positive for the virus.

“This evening I am happy to report that in addition to the President meeting the CDC criteria for the safe discontinuation of isolation, this morning’s COVID PCR sample demonstrates, by currently recognized standards, he is no longer considered a transmission risk to others,” White House physician Dr. Sean Conley said in a memo.

“Now at day 10 from symptom onset, fever-free for well over 24 hours and all symptoms improved, the assortment of advanced diagnostic tests obtained reveal there is no longer evidence of actively replicating virus,” Conley added.

Conley’s announcement came hours after Trump held his first public event since his October 1 diagnosis, which had been followed by a three-day stay at Walter Reed National Military Medical Center. Ahead of the

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Trump no longer poses infection risk, White House doctor says

President Donald Trump “no longer poses an infection risk” to others and can safely end his isolation period, according to a memo released Saturday night by White House physician Sean Conley, just over a week after the president announced his Covid-19 diagnosis.

The doctor’s memo came hours after Trump made his first public appearance since his three-day hospital stay — and released an ad touting his recovery from the coronavirus.

Tests of samples taken Saturday morning from the president show that “by currently recognized standards, he is no longer considered a transmission risk,” Conley wrote. At ten days after he first developed symptoms, and after going fever-free for more than 24 hours, Trump met “CDC criteria” for ending isolation, the doctor added.

The CDC says that most patients should isolate for at least 10 days after the start of their symptoms, and can end isolation at or beyond that point

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Face Masks Are Here To Stay ‘At Least Through Winter But Possibly Longer’

From Women’s Health

#PandemicLife has been going for what feels like forever (real time: six months), and the whole thing is starting to feel endless. With restrictions on just about every aspect of life and the constant need to wear face masks in public, it’s only natural to wonder when the novel coronavirus pandemic will end. Or, at the very least, when you can stop wearing face masks everywhere.

Sure, you already know that face masks are one of several crucial ways you can help prevent the spread of COVID-19, per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and World Health Organization (WHO). With more than 200,000 deaths in the U.S. and seven million confirmed cases (and counting!), per Johns Hopkins, strapping on a mask is a pretty small sacrifice to make for the greater good of all. Especially the elderly or immunocompromised among us. But no one

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Why absence could make your heart go longer

A doctor monitoring your health without even setting eyes on you used to be the stuff of science fiction.

But thanks to modern technology, Britain is seeing a gradual shift towards so-called remote medicine, where patients are supervised round the clock by high-tech implants or devices while at home.

Complex tests and check-ups that once required bulky hospital equipment are now performed without the patient needing to step outside their front door — with the results transmitted via smartphone technology straight to their doctor’s computer.

There may be caveats if the device needs to be surgically implanted, as this carries a chance, albeit low, of triggering life-threatening infections.

A 2015 study suggested that faulty heart implants could be responsible for up to 2,000 deaths a year in the UK, although this has been strongly disputed by the British Heart Foundation. (Stock image)

Some implantable devices have also been known to

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Breast cancer treatment comes later, lasts longer for Black women

Among breast cancer patients in the United States, Black women are more likely to start treatment later and to have a longer treatment period than white women, new research shows.

For the study, researchers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill analyzed data from more than 2,800 patients (about equal numbers of Black women and White women) with stage 1 to 3 breast cancer in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study.

The overall median time to start of treatment was 34 days, but Black women were more likely than White women to have a delayed start to treatment (13% versus 8%, respectively) and a long treatment duration (30% versus 21%, respectively).

Nearly one-third (32%) of younger Black women were in the highest quartile of treatment duration, compared with just over 22% of younger White women. Meanwhile, 28% of older Black women had prolonged treatment duration compared with 20% of

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