Even as the Economy Grew, More Children Lost Health Insurance

The share of children with health coverage in the United States fell for the third consecutive year in 2019, according to census data, after decades of increases.

The decline occurred during a period of economic growth — before the coronavirus pandemic caused broad job losses that might have cost many more Americans their health insurance.

A report Friday by the Georgetown Center for Children and Families found that the ranks of uninsured children grew the most in Texas and Florida, and that Latino children were disproportionately affected. Nationally, the number of children without health insurance rose by 320,000 last year alone, to a total of nearly 4.4 million children, the report found.

“What’s so troubling about this data is we were making so much progress as a country,” said Joan Alker, the center’s executive director and an author of the report. “And now that progress is clearly reversing.”

The picture

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Lost your job and health insurance? Here is what you need to know

As the global pandemic enters its seventh month, millions of Americans lack health insurance. 

According to research by the Economic Policy Institute published in late August and taking into account jobs gained back after the worst of the shutdowns during the spring, the coronavirus pandemic has left more than six million Americans without job-sponsored health insurance. When you take into account dependents, that number rises to more than 12 million. 

“Though we don’t yet know precisely how damaging the Covid-19 shock has been to health insurance access, the shock has laid bare the huge uncertainty that employer-linked health insurance introduces into U.S. families’ lives. Even in normal times millions of U.S. households must manage coverage transitions in a given month. During economic crises, these coverage changes increasingly include transitioning into uninsured status, which puts families’ health and financial security at risk,” wrote Josh Bivens, author of the report and director

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The Daily 202: Trump tries frantically to make up lost ground with seniors, promising free medicine and checks

Other polls released over the last week show Biden leading among voters 65 and older, including in the battlegrounds of Florida, Wisconsin, Michigan and Pennsylvania. Pew’s survey was in the field from Wednesday, the day after the first presidential debate, through Monday, the day Trump checked himself out of Walter Reed after his three-night stay in the hospital. Pew’s unusually large sample size of 10,543 registered voters means smaller margins of error for subgroups, which allows for deeper analysis.

Trump and many of his top advisers see his weakness among seniors as an existential threat to his hopes for a second term, and the president is demanding that his aides use all the levers of the federal government to woo older voters who have drifted away during the final 25 days of the campaign.

The president tweeted a two-and-a-half minute video Thursday afternoon of himself speaking directly to seniors, whom

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‘I Lost Over 100 Lbs. In 1.5 Years By Making These 4 Simple Tweaks To My Diet’

My name is Ashley Kincade (@ashleyloveebugg), and I am 25 years old. I live in Chandler, Arizona, and I am an operations manager. I was tired of having knee pain and no energy, so I worked with my doctor to create a calorie deficit to lose weight and did at-home YouTube workouts and High Fitness classes to lose over 100 pounds.



a woman standing in front of a mirror posing for the camera: Ashley K. lost over 100 lbs. after her doc helped her calculate a daily calorie intake and cut processed foods. She also did High Fitness and Youtube workouts.


© Ashley Kincade
Ashley K. lost over 100 lbs. after her doc helped her calculate a daily calorie intake and cut processed foods. She also did High Fitness and Youtube workouts.

Before my weight loss journey, I struggled with overeating, food addiction, emotional eating, and yo-yo dieting. I was always too fatigued to workout, and I would end up giving up on working out because I thought it was too hard.

My feet and legs hurt all the time, and I was in my early 20s. I

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‘I Got Healthy, Didn’t Starve Myself I Lost 5.5 Stone in a Year

Video: I went vegan for 10 weeks and this is what it did to my mind and body (The Independent)

I went vegan for 10 weeks and this is what it did to my mind and body

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UP NEXT

My name is Jenny Chatelain (@jenniie_fit), and I’m 29 years old. I’m from Haiti and was raised in Canada, and I currently work as a respiratory therapist. I lost 78 pounds by staying in a calorie deficit and slowly increasing my weight lifting workouts over the course of a year.



a couple of people posing for the camera: With a calorie deficit and slowly increasing her weight lifting and HIIT workouts from 2 to 5 days a week, Jenny Chatelain lost almost 6 stone in one year.


© Provided by Women’s Health UK
With a calorie deficit and slowly increasing her weight lifting and HIIT workouts from 2 to 5 days a week, Jenny Chatelain lost almost 6 stone in one year.

When it comes to losing weight, my biggest struggle has always been my love of food. It’s so convenient to go out

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England lost 16,000 new coronavirus cases, blames computer glitch

The glitch was no mere rounding error in the government’s accounting, but another serious stumble at a crucial moment, when the British government is daily trying to decide where to tighten regional lockdowns to slow a second wave of the virus.

After the error was spotted and the lost cases accounted for, the government’s report of new daily infections nearly doubled — from 12,872 on Saturday to 22,961 on Sunday — sparking renewed angst among officials in London and England’s north, where most of the new cases were centered.

Michael Brodie, the interim head of Public Health England, said the issue was identified late Friday in the computer process that communicates positive results from labs to the country’s reporting dashboards. Some data files containing positive results had exceeded the maximum file size, he said, according to the BBC.

“We fully understand the concern this may cause,” Brodie added, “and further

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A Texas family lost four members to Covid-19. Now they want to save others from heartbreak.

The coronavirus had already killed Nieves Salas Solis’ mother and brother when he called his daughter from a hospital bed with a chilling message: “I’m next.”

Nieves, 62, who grew up in Dallas and in recent years lived in a Mexican border town doing community outreach, had a high fever and shortness of breath. It was mid-August, and he had managed to drive himself to a hospital in Harlingen, Texas, where doctors confirmed that he had Covid-19. But their efforts to clear his lungs were not working, said his daughter, Ana Alonso.

Ana knew her father was grieving his mother, Eva Solis-Salas, 89, who died Aug. 6, and a brother, Ruperto Salas Solis, 67, who died Aug. 10, after their own brief battles with the coronavirus.

IMAGE: Ana Alonso and Eva Solis-Salas (Ana Alonso)
IMAGE: Ana Alonso and Eva Solis-Salas (Ana Alonso)

But the thought of losing him, too, was unimaginable. Nieves was a “health freak” who ran

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A family of 7 lost their home in Washington’s wildfires. Then they all got Covid-19

They have now quarantined themselves in two hotel rooms in Spokane Valley, where they’re recovering and trying to plan their futures.

The Grahams lost their home, a barn and outbuildings where they stored things they weren’t using, special baby clothes and other family mementos. Their dog was OK and their chicken coop was also spared, though some of the birds’ feathers may have been singed.

“We were planning to come back that night, so we didn’t pack a single thing,” Jessica said.

They stayed with family after the fire and think that’s how they were exposed to the coronavirus — Jessica’s dad had flu-like symptoms and Matthew’s mom tested positive on September 20 after she’d babysat the children.

“We were starting to experience symptoms at that time that we were hoping was just due to hazardous air quality,” Jessica said. “But then that had gone away and we were getting

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With 2,000 dead, Minn. health leaders consider what state has learned, lost

The COVID-19 pandemic has inundated people with waves of numbers about infections and positivity rates and diagnostic test performance, but the milestone Minnesota reached this weekend is sobering.

Two thousand deaths.

That’s the population of Hinckley, Eyota, or Warroad.

“Two thousand is a big number,” said Dr. Rahul Koranne of the Minnesota Hospital Association. “That’s heartbreaking.”

Minnesota took about two months to reach its first 1,000 COVID-19 deaths in late May, but then four months to reach the next 1,000 — a slowdown that reflects changes in the spread of the virus, improvements in oxygen management of hospitalized patients, and interventions that cut outbreaks in long-term care facilities that were particularly deadly.

State health leaders paused silently at a meeting Friday to absorb the death toll and contemplate what Minnesota has learned amid the pandemic and what it has lost.

“We want to acknowledge the positives, but I also think

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