The Best Time to Switch From a Medicare Advantage Plan to a Medigap Plan

Last of a three-part series.

Medicare’s annual election period runs from Oct. 15 through December 7.

And that’s the best time to switch from a Medicare Advantage plan to a Medigap plan, according to Jae Oh, author of Maximize Your Medicare.

According to Oh, it’s critical that your Medigap carrier your application before you switch out of your Medicare Advantage and sign up for a standalone Part D plan. The worst outcome, he says, would be to have your Medigap application denied and choose a Part D plan. That would “eject” the Medicare Advantage plan that you may have in place and leave you without additional health benefits, said Oh.

Watch Oh’s videos on the topics on YouTube. Also read Buying your Medigap policy.

So, why might you switch from a Medicare Advantage plan to a Medigap plan?

There are a few reasons, according to Oh. The annual contracts are

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The Latest: Judge Won’t Block NY Plan to Limit Gatherings | World News

ALBANY, N.Y. — A federal judge has refused to block New York’s plan to temporarily limit the size of religious gatherings in COVID-19 hot spots.

U.S. District Judge Kiyo Matsumoto issued the ruling Friday after an emergency hearing in a lawsuit brought by rabbis and synagogues who said the restrictions were unconstitutional.

They had sought to have enforcement delayed until at least after Jewish holy days this weekend. The rules limit indoor prayer services in certain areas to no more than 10 people.

The judge said the state had an interest in protecting public safety.

HERE’S WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT THE VIRUS OUTBREAK:

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Trump outraged by Democrats’ plan to assess president’s fitness to serve

Democrats provoked an angry tirade from Donald Trump on Friday by proposing a congressional commission to assess whether US presidents are capable of performing their duties or should be removed from office.



a group of people sitting at a table: Photograph: Carlos Barría/Reuters


© Provided by The Guardian
Photograph: Carlos Barría/Reuters

The gambit came a week after Trump was flown to a military hospital for treatment for coronavirus and 25 days before an election. The president returned to the White House on Monday but has caused concern with erratic behaviour.

Related: Trump unlikely to travel for rally while Pelosi says medication has him ‘in an altered state’ – live

“This is not about President Trump. He will face the judgment of the voters but he shows the need for us to create a process for future presidents,” Nancy Pelosi, the speaker of the House of Representatives, told a press conference in which she also took a swipe at the British prime

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Verma, Meadows push to finalize $200 drug-card plan for seniors by Election Day

Caught by surprise by President Donald Trump’s promise to deliver drug-discount cards to seniors, health officials are scrambling to get the nearly $8 billion plan done by Election Day, according to five officials and draft documents obtained by POLITICO.



a person posing for the camera: Seema Verma, administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.


© Tasos Katopodis/Getty Images
Seema Verma, administrator of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

The taxpayer-funded plan, which was only announced two weeks ago and is being justified inside the White House and the health department as a test of the Medicare program, is being driven by Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Administrator Seema Verma and White House chief of staff Mark Meadows, the officials said. The administration is seeking to finalize the plan as soon as Friday and send letters to 39 million Medicare beneficiaries next week, informing seniors of Trump’s new effort to lower their drug costs, although many seniors would not receive the actual cards until

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Distrusting Trump, States Plan to Vet COVID Vaccines Themselves. Bad Idea, Say Experts. | Best States

By JoNel Aleccia and Liz Szabo

As trust in the Food and Drug Administration wavers, several states have vowed to conduct independent reviews of any COVID-19 vaccine the federal agency authorizes.

But top health experts say such vetting may be misguided, even if it reflects a well-founded lack of confidence in the Trump administration — especially now that the FDA has held firm with rules that make a risky preelection vaccine release highly unlikely.

At least six states and the District of Columbia have indicated they intend to review the scientific data for any vaccine approved to fight COVID-19, with some citing concern over political interference by President Donald Trump and his appointees. Officials in New York and California said they are convening expert panels expressly for that purpose.

Photos: Daily Life, Disrupted

TOPSHOT - A passenger in an outfit (R) poses for a picture as a security guard wearing a facemask as a preventive measure against the Covid-19 coronavirus stands nearby on a last century-style boat, featuring a theatrical drama set between the 1920s and 1930s in Wuhan, in Chinas central Hubei province on September 27, 2020. (Photo by Hector RETAMAL / AFP) (Photo by HECTOR RETAMAL/AFP via Getty Images)

“Frankly, I’m not going to trust the federal government’s opinion and I wouldn’t recommend [vaccines] to New

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Some states plan to vet Covid-19 vaccines themselves. Bad idea, experts say.

As trust in the Food and Drug Administration wavers, several states have vowed to conduct independent reviews of any Covid-19 vaccine the federal agency authorizes.

But top health experts say such vetting may be misguided, even if it reflects what they say is a well-founded lack of confidence in the Trump administration — especially now that the FDA has released rules that make a risky pre-election vaccine release highly unlikely.

Full coverage of the coronavirus outbreak

At least six states and the District of Columbia have indicated they intend to review the scientific data for any vaccine approved to fight Covid-19, with some citing concern over political interference by President Donald Trump and his appointees. Officials in New York and California said they are convening expert panels expressly for that purpose.

“Frankly, I’m not going to trust the federal government’s opinion, and I wouldn’t recommend [vaccines] to New Yorkers based

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In a first, 2 counties move backward on state’s reopening plan; Ventura moves forward

Patrons ate in May at Ventura's BusyBee 50's Cafe. In July, Gov. Gavin Newsom closed all indoor dining at restaurants, but on Tuesday, Ventura County advanced in the state's reopening blueprint, allowing a return to limited indoor seating. <span class="copyright">(Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)</span>
Patrons ate in May at Ventura’s BusyBee 50’s Cafe. In July, Gov. Gavin Newsom closed all indoor dining at restaurants, but on Tuesday, Ventura County advanced in the state’s reopening blueprint, allowing a return to limited indoor seating. (Wally Skalij / Los Angeles Times)

Although a handful of counties advanced in the state’s COVID-19 reopening plan Tuesday, two moved backward — the first time since California launched its tiered system that parts of the state have regressed.

Following an increase in cases, Tehama County moved back to Tier 1, the most restrictive, and Shasta County moved back to Tier 2. The setbacks will affect business sectors that had been given the green light to reopen or expand capacity in those areas.

Shasta County, which averaged 173.7 COVID-19 cases per 100,000 residents in the last seven days, and Tehama County, with 124.3 cases per 100,000 residents during the same period, are

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Gyms and fitness centers plan to reopen

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Shift Supervisor Geana Silvestri, front, and Fitness Attendant Marvin Espeleta, wipe down and sanitize equipment in the free-weight section of the Paradise Fitness gym in Dededo on Friday, Oct. 2, 2020. In the latest round of lifted restrictions by Gov. Lou Leon Guerrero, gyms, fitness centers and dance studios will be allowed to resume indoor operations, but each will be subject to limits of no more than 25% occupancy load and must abide to applicable Department of Public Health and Social Services guidance. Paradise Fitness, with locations in Hagåtña, Tumon and Dededo, is preparing its facilities to reopen and welcome back its patrons beginning 8:00 a.m., Saturday morning. (Photo: Rick Cruz/PDN)

The coronavirus pandemic continues to have a major impact on the physical and mental health of residents placed on lockdown. After a month off, Guam residents are ready to hit the gym. 

Announced on Oct. 1 by Gov.

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What is the treatment plan for President Trump’s COVID-19?

By Deena Beasley

(Reuters) – U.S. President Donald Trump on Friday said he and his wife Melania had tested positive for COVID-19, and the White House said he was given an experimental treatment designed to combat the virus as well as a small array of treatments including aspirin and Vitamin D.

Trump, 74, has a slight fever, a source said, and is being taken to Walter Reed military hospital for several days as a precaution. Trump’s gender, age and weight make him more vulnerable to developing severe COVID-19, and give him a notional risk of around 4% of dying from it, health experts said. [nL8N2GT3UD]

WHAT IS THE EXPERIMENTAL TREATMENT TRUMP IS TAKING?

One of the most anticipated classes of experimental COVID-19 drugs is monoclonal antibodies: manufactured copies of human antibodies to the virus. The injected antibodies are designed to begin fighting the virus immediately and are being developed to

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N.Y.C.’s School Testing Plan May Miss Large Outbreaks, Study Finds

School reopening has become a tangled logistical process worldwide, as public officials, administrators, teachers, parents and students have had to debate measures like face shields, ventilation, shift learning and whether to go virtual partially, or altogether. Most large school districts in the country, with the exception of New York City, have gone all virtual for most or all of the fall semester, because of stubbornly high virus rates and concerns from educators, their unions, and some parents.

Reopening has become particularly fraught in New York, where Mr. de Blasio has twice delayed the start of in-person classes because of a staffing crisis and pushback from the unions representing city teachers and principals.

School systems around the world have seen widely diverging outcomes when they reopen. Some countries, like Israel, have seen explosive outbreaks, despite containment measures. Others, like Ireland and South Korea, have kept schools open without major problems.

To

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