Trump claims he’s free of virus, ready for campaign trail

WASHINGTON (AP) — President Donald Trump on Sunday declared he was ready to return to the campaign trail despite unanswered questions about his health on the eve of a Florida rally meant to kick off the stretch run before Election Day.

His impending return comes after the White House doctor said he was no longer at risk of transmitting the coronavirus but did not say explicitly whether Trump had tested negative for it. The president insisted he was now “immune” from the virus, a claim that was impossible to prove and added to the unknowns about the president’s health.

“I’m immune,” Trump said in an interview on Fox News Channel’s “Sunday Morning Futures.” “The president is in very good shape to fight the battles.”

In a memo released Saturday night by the White House, Navy Cmdr. Dr. Sean Conley said Trump met the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention criteria

Read More

Alex Jones makes false claims on Trump’s COVID-19 meds

CLOSE

US President Donald Trump on Saturday said he was “feeling great” as he made his first public appearance since returning to the White House after being treated for the coronavirus. (Oct. 10)

AP Domestic

The claim: Walter Reed hospital was trying to kill Trump for ‘deep state’

President Donald Trump is back at the White House after receiving treatment for COVID-19 at Walter Reed Army Medical Center. But a viral video by right-wing media  outlet InfoWars claims the doctors there weren’t really trying to help the president. 

“President Trump is being given very dangerous experimental drugs that no one has ever been given together,” InfoWars’ Alex Jones said. “President Trump is in grave danger. Evidence is mounting he’s being deliberately killed at Walter Reed Military Hospital.”

Jones insinuates that in addition to Trump’s treatment being “dangerous” that it may be a part of a bigger scheme by the “Deep

Read More

Vice presidential debate: Kamala Harris claims she won’t take vaccine if Trump recommends

Democratic vice presidential candidate Kamala Harris said Wednesday that she would not take a vaccine recommended by President Trump during a heated debate clash over the White House’s response to the coronavirus pandemic.

Harris accused Vice President Mike Pence, head of the Trump administration’s coronavirus task force, of failing to disclose critical information to Americans in the early days of the pandemic. When asked about a poll showing half of Americans would not take a vaccine as soon as it is available, Harris indicated that she was skeptical of Trump’s involvement in the rollout of a potential vaccine.

“If the public health professionals, if Dr. Fauci, if the doctors tell us we should take it, I’ll be the first in line to take it, absolutely,” Harris said. “But if Donald Trump tells us we should take it, I’m not taking it.”

Harris, citing a recent report from Washington Post journalist

Read More

Trump claims his Covid treatment means a cure is imminent

“Hi, perhaps you recognize me — it’s your favorite president,” Trump said.

“I wasn’t feeling so hot and within a short period of time they gave me Regeneron,” he said, referring to drug company that makes the experimental antibody cocktail he received. “It was unbelievable. I felt good immediately. I felt as good three days ago as I do now.”

Trump later said of the drug, “I call that a cure,” and suggested that his infection was “a blessing from god” that revealed the drug’s promise. “I think if I didn’t catch [the virus] we’d be looking at that like a bunch of other drugs.

The president for months has also been promising that a coronavirus vaccine is imminent, often pledging to make it available by Election Day. Late-stage clinical trials are underway, but no vaccine maker has yet sought emergency authorization or approval from the Food and Drug

Read More

New guidance to ensure medicine label claims are genuine

The FDA guidance is titled “Providing Regulatory Submissions in Electronic and Non Electronic Format — Promotional Labeling and Advertising Materials for Human Prescription Drugs.” The focus of the document is to provide guidance for pharmaceutical manufacturers, packers and distributors in relation to promotional materials for human

prescription drugs.

By promotional labeling this generally refers to any labeling, other than the FDA-required labeling, that is devised for promotion of the product and can include TV ads, brochures, booklets, websites and any other source, be that paper-based or digital.

The guidance considers appearance, layout, format, and visible impression of promotional materials submitted, and, in tune with the modern age, embraces everything from the style of a promotional booth to the marketing of medicines through the use of video games.

An example of inaccurate marketing is provided by Forbes. This relates to the company Allergan which produced a new eyelash thickening drug Latisse

Read More

Gov. Cuomo falsely claims New York nursing homes ‘never needed’ to take in Covid-positive patients

New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo said that nursing homes “never needed” to accept Covid-positive patients from hospitals in the state due to a shortage of hospital beds.



Andrew Cuomo wearing a suit and tie: NEW YORK, NY - JULY 23: New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks during the daily media briefing at the Office of the Governor of the State of New York on July 23, 2020 in New York City. The Governor said the state liquor authority has suspended 27 bar and restaurant alcohol licenses for violations of social distancing rules as public officials try to keep the coronavirus outbreak under control. (Photo by Jeenah Moon/Getty Images)


© Jeenah Moon/Getty Images North America/Getty Images
NEW YORK, NY – JULY 23: New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo speaks during the daily media briefing at the Office of the Governor of the State of New York on July 23, 2020 in New York City. The Governor said the state liquor authority has suspended 27 bar and restaurant alcohol licenses for violations of social distancing rules as public officials try to keep the coronavirus outbreak under control. (Photo by Jeenah Moon/Getty Images)

During a press call Wednesday, Finger Lakes News Radio asked Cuomo about his administration’s advisory in late March requiring that nursing homes accept the readmission of patients from hospitals, even if they were positive for Covid-19.

The governor’s office has repeatedly

Read More

Police Probe Pioneering Hip Surgeon Over Bone Hoarding Claims

Police are investigating claims that a renowned surgeon may have kept thousands of bones from patients he operated on.

Derek McMinn, referred to on his website as the ‘father of modern hip resurfacing’, was responsible for a type of surgery that helped former world number one tennis player Sir Andy Murray return to topflight competition.

Mr McMinn has since been suspended from Edgbaston Hospital in Birmingham.

The Independent reported that he allegedly kept the bones of at least 5224 of his patients over a quarter of a century.

Hospital owner, Circle Health Group, said it took the matter “incredibly seriously”.

Investigation Under Human Tissue Law

It is understood that West Mercia Police are investigating an allegation of Breach of Statutory Licensing requirements under the Human Tissue Act 2004. Under the law, it may be an offence to store human tissue for certain purposes without a licence.

The inquiry was launched

Read More

MUA labels claims union’s tactics caused medical shortages lies

A militant union has pushed back against claims its industrial action tactics are causing medical shortages, labelling them “outrageous lies”.

The Maritime Union of Australia (MUA) is in negotiations with Patrick Terminal at Port Botany in Sydney over increased pay for wharfies.

Pharmacy Guild Australia senior vice-president Trent Twomey claimed in a Daily Telegraph report the MUA’s actions were causing medicine shortages.

The union said the assertion was categorically false.

“We have always taken a very keen interest in ensuring we are not stopping any medication from coming across the quay line,” MUA Sydney branch secretary Paul McAleer said.

“They can tell us which boxes they are and we’ll ensure they get off these vessels.”

A spokesperson for Pharmacy Guild Australia said: “We welcome their commitment today to let medical freight through.”

The months-long dispute intensified on Monday as Patrick sought support from the Fair Work Commission and Industrial Relations

Read More

Most “scientific” beauty product claims are bogus, study finds

We’ve all seen beauty claims in magazines that promise to give us “better skin in just two weeks” or to “dramatically reduce the appearance of fine lines and wrinkles.”

But many women are not convinced. A new study found fewer than one out of five of such claims was considered truthful by a panel of readers — and ads that used scientific language to describe the benefits were even less persuasive.

Researchers at Valdosta State University in Georgia and the University of Nebraska-Lincoln analyzed 289 makeup, hair care, fragrance and skin care advertisements from April 2013 issues of seven fashion magazines including Vogue, Marie Claire and Glamour.

The claims were divided into categories such as scientific claims like “clinically proven” and endorsement claims like “dermatologists recommend.” Three female judges with varying levels of knowledge about the cosmetics industry sorted these claims into four categories: outright lie, omission, vague

Read More

50 Percent US Kids With Mental Health Conditions Remain Untreated, Claims Study

Half of the children in the United States suffering from any kind of mental disorder remain untreated, revealed a recently published study. The researchers analyzed data gathered from the 2016 National Survey of Children’s Health, a nationwide survey administered to the parents of young adolescents.

The findings revealed that out of the 46.6 million youngsters in the age group of 6 to 18 years, whose parents filled the survey, around 7.7 million teens were suffering from at least one type of mental health issue like anxiety, depression, or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Also, a year before this survey was conducted, only half of these children received counselling or any kind of treatment offered by a mental health provider.

The survey further showed that the percentage of young teens diagnosed with a mental health disorder and not receiving any treatment from a provider fluctuated extensively between 72.2 percent in North Carolina and … Read More