Some U.S. doctors flee to New Zealand where the outbreak is under control and science is respected

Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern speaks to media at a press conference ahead of a nationwide lockdown at Parliament on March 25, 2020 in Wellington, New Zealand.

Hagen Hopkins | Getty Images

Dr. Judy Melinek knew it was time to make a change when she started fear for her health and safety.

While working as acting chief forensic pathologist for Alameda County in California, she read early reports about a virus in Wuhan, China. By June, after repeatedly sounding the alarm about the need for health workers to have sufficient personal protective equipment, she’d had enough. She also hoped for temperature checks, social distancing and masks, but she noticed that not all of the staff in her office were taking these steps.

And then an email appeared offering her the opportunity to relocate to New Zealand, a country that has reported less than 2,000 coronavirus cases and 25 deaths, drawing widespread

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Trump says he’s ‘immune’ to COVID. His doctors won’t say when he last tested negative

President Donald Trump on Sunday said he may have the “protective glow” of immunity from COVID-19 although it remains unknown when he last tested negative for the disease.

In an extensive interview with Fox News’ Maria Bartiromo, Trump claimed he “beat” the novel coronavirus, passing the “highest standards” for proving so. Trump said he is also no longer taking any medications to combat the virus after being placed on a heavy steroid typically given to individuals with more severe cases.

“It looks like I’m immune for, I don’t know, maybe a long time, maybe a short time,” he said. “It could be a lifetime. Nobody really knows, but I’m immune. So the president is in very good shape to fight the battles.”

As the Associated Press reported, COVID-19 reinfection is unlikely for at least three months after acquiring the virus, but few diseases come with lifetime immunity. Researchers said in

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Trump declares himself ‘immune’ to Covid-19. His doctors won’t say when he last tested negative.

President Donald Trump on Sunday said he may have the “protective glow” of immunity from Covid-19 although it remains unknown when he last tested negative for the disease.

In an extensive interview with Fox News’ Maria Bartiromo, Trump claimed he “beat” the novel coronavirus, passing the “highest standards” for proving so. Trump said he is also no longer taking any medications to combat the virus after being placed on a heavy steroid typically given to individuals with more severe cases.

“It looks like I’m immune for, I don’t know, maybe a long time, maybe a short time,” he said. “It could be a lifetime. Nobody really knows, but I’m immune. So the president is in very good shape to fight the battles.”

As the Associated Press reported, Covid-19 reinfection is unlikely for at least three months after acquiring the virus, but few diseases come with lifetime immunity. Researchers said in

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Washington Post board urges more transparency on Trump health: ‘No more spin doctors’



a group of people standing in front of a building: Washington Post board urges more transparency on Trump health: 'No more spin doctors'


© Getty Images
Washington Post board urges more transparency on Trump health: ‘No more spin doctors’

The Washington Post’s editorial board on Friday called for the White House to be more transparent about the state of President Trump’s health, demanding “no more spin doctors.”

“All presidents like to project robust health and are loath to admit weakness, even if caused by events beyond their control.” the board wrote in an opinion piece, citing when President Reagan was shot in 1981.

“But when a president’s health is abnormal, the public has a right to know, especially if the problem has any effect on his fitness to perform his duties. In Mr. Trump’s case, the unanswered questions are glaring,” they continued.

Trump was brought to the Walter Reed Medical Center on Friday, Oct. 2, just hours after announcing that both he and first lady Melania Trump had tested positive for the

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Is Trump ready to hit the campaign trail? Here’s what doctors say

Just days after receiving oxygen therapy for Covid-19, US President Donald Trump is busy giving long TV interviews and says he’s eager to return to the campaign trail. 

But is he risking his recovery by taking on too much too soon, and could he still infect others? 

– Each case is unique – 

According to Amesh Adalja, an infectious disease and critical care doctor as well as scholar at Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore, there is a wide variation between patients in terms of the speed of their recovery.

“Some people are able to resume their activities of daily living pretty quickly. There are other people to take some weeks before they’re back to their baseline,” he said.

In general, “for someone in their 70s who was hospitalized with Covid, I would say it takes a couple of weeks to get back to their baseline.

“But because he’s the president,

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The Difference Between PCOS And Endometriosis, Explained By Doctors

In the world of reproductive conditions that can be tough to diagnose, two tend to get the most attention: polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and endometriosis. While you’ve probably at least heard of both of these conditions, you might be fuzzy on the details. And, with that, it’s easy to confuse the two.

It’s important to know that it’s not rare to have either one of these health issues. “These are two relatively common gynecological conditions,” says Taraneh Shirazian, MD, an ob-gyn with NYU Langone Health. PCOS affects one in 10 women of childbearing age, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office on Women’s Health (OWH). Endometriosis is slightly more common, impacting more than 11 percent of women between the ages of 15 and 44, according to the OWH.

Both conditions are notoriously tough to diagnose, given that their symptoms could be caused by a range of

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Tennessee doctors removed a man’s heart to save his life

MEMPHIS, Tenn. – In an extraordinary operation, a Mississippi man’s heart was removed and replaced with what Baptist Memorial Hospital doctors call a “total artificial heart” — battery-charged electromechanical devices that will keep the 41-year-old man’s blood pumping until a heart transplant can be arranged.



a person wearing a hat: Heart patient Brian Pedigo sits on a hospital bed at Baptist Memorial Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. Pedigo's heart was replaced with two ventricular assist devices and a breast implant.


© Ariel Cobbert/The Commercial Appeal
Heart patient Brian Pedigo sits on a hospital bed at Baptist Memorial Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., on Wednesday, Oct. 7, 2020. Pedigo’s heart was replaced with two ventricular assist devices and a breast implant.

Wearing a surgical-style mask decorated with an American flag and the motto “United We Stand,” artificial heart recipient Brian Pedigosaid Wednesday that his life since his first heart attack —which came “11 days before my 33rd birthday” — had been a constant struggle with heart disease, including a “massive” 2017 heart attack and the almost complete bodily shutdown that led to his Sept. 3 surgery at

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As virus fills French ICUs anew, doctors ask what went wrong

PARIS (AP) — Over the course of a single overnight shift this week, three new COVID-19 patients were rushed into Dr. Karim Debbat’s small intensive care ward in the southern French city of Arles. His service now has more virus patients than during the pandemic’s first wave, and is scrambling to create new ICU beds elsewhere in the hospital to accommodate the sick.

Similar scenes are playing out across France. COVID-19 patients now occupy 40% of ICU beds in the Paris region, and nearly a quarter in ICUs nationwide, as several weeks of growing infections among young people spread to vulnerable populations.

Despite being one of the world’s richest nations — and one of those hardest hit when the pandemic first washed over the world — France hasn’t added significant ICU capacity or the staff needed to manage extra beds, according to national health agency figures and doctors at multiple

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Doctors and nurses battle virus skeptics

MISSION, Kan. (AP) — Treating the sick and dying isn’t even the toughest part for nurse Amelia Montgomery as the coronavirus surges in her corner of red America.

It’s dealing with patients and relatives who don’t believe the virus is real, refuse to wear masks and demand treatments like hydroxychloroquine, which President Donald Trump has championed even though experts say it is not effective against the scourge that has killed over 210,000 in the U.S.

Montgomery finds herself, like so many other doctors and nurses, in a world where the politics of the crisis are complicating treatment efforts, with some people even resisting getting tested.


It’s unclear how Trump’s bout with the virus will affect the situation, but some doctors aren’t optimistic. After a few days of treatment at a military hospital, the president tweeted Monday, “Don’t be afraid of Covid. Don’t let it dominate your life. … I feel

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Regeneron Antibodies in Demand After Trump Treatment, Doctors Seek More Data | Top News

(Reuters) – Patients are asking to join clinical trials of antibody-based COVID-19 drugs after U.S. President Donald Trump was treated last week with an experimental therapy from Regeneron Pharmaceuticals Inc, and on Wednesday he promised to make it free to Americans while touting its benefits.

Medical experts said more data is needed to assess the treatment’s efficacy before wider use should be allowed.

Trump was discharged from the hospital late on Monday, just a few days after being diagnosed with COVID-19 that caused enough lung inflammation for blood oxygen levels to fall.

According to his doctor, blood tests on Monday detected infection-fighting antibodies, which a Regeneron spokesperson said were probably from the treatment.

In a video shot outside the White House, Trump credited the Regeneron therapy for his feeling much better than when he was first diagnosed and said he would push for emergency use authorizations (EUA) of that treatment

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