Summit, Colorado Center for Personalized Medicine to Develop Saliva Tests for COVID, Head & Neck Cancer

AURORA, Colo., Oct. 14, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Summit Biolabs, Inc., an early-stage molecular diagnostics company specializing in saliva-based testing for COVID-19 and head & neck cancer, and the Colorado Center for Personalized Medicine (CCPM) at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus announced today a broad strategic collaboration involving research, development and commercialization of saliva liquid-biopsy tests for early cancer detection and diagnosis of COVID-19 and other viral contagions.

The CCPM holds one of the largest research biobanks in the United States with clinical data from more than 8.7 million de-identified patient records and plans to integrate the data with personalized genomic information.

“This partnership brings two innovative programs together to optimize COVID testing at a time when it’s desperately needed,” says Kathleen Barnes, Ph.D., Professor and Director of CCPM at the University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus. “Collaborations like this are crucial in moving research forward and

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Trump administration proposals could stymie personalized medicine

“It is more important to know what kind of patient the disease has than to know what kind of disease the patient has.”

Although Hippocrates made this keen observation more than 2,400 years ago, physicians did not have the tools to decipher the biological and environmental factors influencing an individual’s health and well-being until recently.

Since the human genome was finally mapped in 2003, scientists have made tremendous progress in advancing personalized medicine. By tailoring health care to an individual’s biological characteristics, circumstances, and values, personalized medicine can bring unprecedented benefits to patients with rare genetic disorders, cancer, and other diseases.

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The widely variable effects of the novel coronavirus serve as a painful reminder of the importance of understanding how and why people respond differently to the same disease.

But two recent moves by the Trump administration threaten to turn back the clock on biomedical progress in personalized

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