Dr. Scott Gottlieb says U.S. coronavirus testing must still improve

Dr. Scott Gottlieb told CNBC on Monday the U.S. still needs to expand and improve its coronavirus testing and contact tracing to bring its epidemic under control — even if it will never be able to employ an operation as rigorous as China.

“We don’t need to have their level of surveillance state to have better testing and tracing in place, and we could be doing a lot better at calling on collective action for people to wear masks on a more routine basis,” Gottlieb said on “Squawk Box.”

The former U.S. Food and Drug Administration commissioner pointed to recent developments in the eastern Chinese city of Qingdao. After 12 cases were reported, the city now plans to test all 9 million residents over the next five days, according to the BBC.

“So they’ll manage to snuff out that outbreak,” said Gottlieb, who served in the Trump administration from May

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Testing positive: New York has among lowest state rates of new COVID-19 cases

New York continues to have one of the nation’s lowest rates of people testing positive for the coronavirus, but experts say recent outbreaks and cooler weather could push those numbers up.

The state had the second-lowest positive test rate in the country, according to Covid Act Now, a nonprofit website run by epidemiologists, public health experts, data scientists and others that analyzes COVID-19 data. In the latest analysis, from Saturday, only Maine, at 0.5%,had a lower rate than New York, which was tied with Vermont for the second-lowest positivity rate of 1.2%. Idaho, with 23.9% of people testing positive, had the highest. The group uses a 7-day rolling average of test results.

In March and April, New York was the epicenter for the pandemic in the United States, with hundreds of residents dying of COVID-19 every day.

“We got from where we were in April because we distanced, we isolated,

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Nevada Revokes Halt on Rapid Antigen Testing in Nursing Homes

A week later, however, Admiral Giroir cracked down on Nevada’s “illegal” prohibition on BD’s and Quidel’s tests, which he said had imperiled the residents and staff of nursing homes across the state. “They cannot supersede the PREP Act,” he said.

The false positives that had emerged, Admiral Giroir said, were not only expected but “actually an outstanding result.” No test is perfect, he said.

In the Nevada statement, Dr. Azzam reaffirmed his concerns with the number of false positives that had arisen. “If this laboratory data discrepancy had been reported to Dr. Giroir, we would hope he would have taken the same action as Nevada,” he said. “We too want more testing with rapid turnaround in Nevada, but the results of those tests must be accurate, as they affect clinical care.”

The state’s nursing facilities can resume use of BD’s and Quidel’s products, according to a new Nevada directive issued

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HHS Testing Czar Rips Nevada for Stopping Rapid Tests in Nursing Homes

WASHINGTON — Nevada public health officials’ recent actions preventing nursing homes from using rapid screening tests for COVID-19 are “unjustified” and don’t follow the science on testing, Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) “testing czar” Adm. Brett Giroir, MD, said Friday.

The state’s actions are “not scientifically valid. They must cease their prohibition immediately,” Giroir said on a phone call with reporters. “If you need technical support,” he told the nursing homes, “we are enthusiastic to do more. Lives are at stake and our administration is not going to allow action to risk our seniors or any other vulnerable or underserved population.”

Letter Sent to Nursing Homes

On October 2, the Nevada Department of Health and Human Services sent a letter to healthcare providers and long-term care facilities, noting that the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services had sent point-of-care antigen tests to nursing homes across the country —

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HBCUs to expand COVID testing after receiving funds for lab equipment

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COVID-19 widespread testing is crucial to fighting the pandemic, but is there enough testing? The answer is in the positivity rates.

USA TODAY

Eight historically Black colleges and universities (HBCUs) have received millions in funding that will allow them to expand and establish on-campus COVID-19 testing facilities.

Thermo Fisher Scientific donated $15 million in diagnostic instruments and test kits to the HBCUs as part of The Just Project, which seeks to address the COVID-19 pandemic in communities of color.

Black Americans have experienced the highest COVID-19 mortality rate (97.9 deaths per 100,000) in the country, more than twice the mortality rate for white Americans, according to analysis by APM Research Lab.

As of Oct. 5, the donations had been given to Howard University College of Medicine, Morehouse School of Medicine, Meharry Medical College, Xavier University of Louisiana, Hampton University, Tuskegee University, Florida A&M University, and North Carolina A&T University,

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OCCHD, OU Medicine to host COVID-19 testing site at local high school

OKLAHOMA CITY (KFOR) – Health officials say that residents in some areas of Oklahoma City will be able to get tested for COVID-19 at mobile testing sites.

The Oklahoma City-County Health Department and OU Medicine will continue their joint effort providing mobile testing in zip codes that are experiencing high COVID-19 positivity rates in Oklahoma County.

On Saturday, Oct. 10, testing will be done at Western Heights High School, located at 8201 S.W. 44th St.

“We are eager to work with OCCHD to expand testing in Oklahoma City, specifically in those areas we know are the hardest hit,” said Erin Walker, assistant vice president of Operations at The Children’s Hospital at OU Medicine. “Testing is a great first step in reducing the spreadof this disease, so we encourage the community to participate.”

Health officials say testing is critical to identify the impact of the virus in the community.

“We’re excited

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DC Faults White House Over Rose Garden Event, Urges Testing | Political News

By ASHRAF KHALIL, Associated Press

WASHINGTON (AP) — In an extraordinary step, the Washington, D.C., Department of Health has released an open letter appealing to all White House staff and anyone who attended a Sept. 26 event in the Rose Garden to seek medical advice and take a COVID-19 test.

The letter indicates a lack of confidence in the White House medical team’s own contact tracing efforts regarding an ongoing virus outbreak that has infected President Donald Trump, multiple senior staff members and two U.S. senators, among others.

Co-signed by nine other local health departments from neighboring jurisdictions in Maryland and Virginia, the letter flatly states a belief that contact tracing on the outbreak has been insufficient.

It says the public appeal is based on, “our preliminary understanding that there has been limited contact tracing performed to date, there may be other staff and residents at risk for exposure to

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Fauci says the treatment Trump called a ‘cure’ may well work, but needs more testing.

Dr. Anthony S. Fauci, the nation’s leading expert on infectious diseases, said that President Trump might be right that the experimental treatment he received and promoted has helped him in his fight with Covid-19 — but that his case alone doesn’t prove it.

“I think it’s a reasonably good chance that the antibody that he received, the Regeneron antibody, made a significant difference in a positive way in his course,” Dr. Fauci, who is not involved in the president’s care, said on Thursday during an interview on MSNBC.

He pushed back against Mr. Trump’s claim that the treatment has now been shown to be a “cure” for the disease, which has killed more than 210,000 Americans so far.

“When you have only one, you can’t make the determination that that’s a cure,” he said. “You have to do a clinical trial involving a large number of individuals, compared either to

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Risky Breast Lumps; Bone Testing Lags in Prostate Cancer; Cancer Breathalyzer?

Benign breast lesions detected after a woman’s initial screening mammogram are more likely to become malignant. (European Breast Cancer Conference)

Younger adults who have never smoked are the group with the biggest increase in use of electronic cigarettes. (American Cancer Society, American Journal of Preventive Medicine)

The FDA issued draft guidance aimed at getting more premenopausal women enrolled in clinical trials of new drugs and biologic agents for breast cancer.

Only one-fourth of men with prostate cancer had testing for bone health and integrity after androgen deprivation therapy, which causes loss of bone mineral. (Journal of the National Comprehensive Cancer Network)

Updated results from a randomized trial supported single-agent nivolumab (Opdivo), as opposed to nivolumab-ipilimumab (Yervoy) combination therapy, as adjuvant therapy for resected melanoma, and adding nivolumab to neoadjuvant chemotherapy significantly improved pathologic complete response in resectable non-small cell lung cancer, Bristol Myers

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WilCo Opens Coronavirus Testing Site In Georgetown

WILLIAMSON COUNTY, TX — Williamson County health district officials on Wednesday announced the opening of a new COVID-19 testing site in Georgetown.

The Williamson County and Cities Health District is partnering with the Texas Department of Emergency Management and the City of Georgetown to open the COVID-19 testing site in the parking lot north of the Georgetown Public Library, 402 W. Eighth St., starting Friday. The walk-up site will operate seven days per week from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.

“With the potential for an increase in COVID-19 cases this fall, testing is an important way for residents to find out if they have the virus,” Georgetown Mayor Dale Ross said in a prepared statement. “We really appreciate the Health District and the state for staffing this convenient, free testing site in Georgetown that will be available every day of the week.”

Registration is required before visiting the testing booth.

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